Concentration Does Matter: The Beneficial and Potentially Harmful Effects of Ascorbate in Humans and Plants

Szilvia Z. Tóth, Tamás Lorincz, A. Szarka

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Significance: Ascorbate (Asc) is an essential compound both in animals and plants, mostly due to its reducing properties, thereby playing a role in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and acting as a cofactor in various enzymatic reactions. Recent Advances: Growing number of evidence shows that excessive Asc accumulation may have negative effects on cellular functions both in humans and plants; inter alia it may negatively affect signaling mechanisms, cellular redox status, and contribute to the production of ROS via the Fenton reaction. Critical Issues: Both plants and humans tightly control cellular Asc levels, possibly via biosynthesis, transport, and degradation, to maintain them in an optimum concentration range, which, among other factors, is essential to minimize the potentially harmful effects of Asc. On the contrary, the Fenton reaction induced by a high-dose Asc treatment in humans enables a potential cancer-selective cell death pathway. Future Directions: The elucidation of Asc induced cancer selective cell death mechanisms may give us a tool to apply Asc in cancer therapy. On the contrary, the regulatory mechanisms controlling cellular Asc levels are also to be considered, for example, when aiming at generating crops with elevated Asc levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1516-1533
Number of pages18
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume29
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 20 2018

Fingerprint

Cell death
Reactive Oxygen Species
Biosynthesis
Scavenging
Cell Death
Crops
Neoplasms
Animals
Degradation
Oxidation-Reduction
Therapeutics
Direction compound

Keywords

  • ascorbate
  • ascorbate biosynthesis
  • cell death
  • pharmacologic ascorbate
  • photosynthesis
  • reactive oxygen species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Concentration Does Matter : The Beneficial and Potentially Harmful Effects of Ascorbate in Humans and Plants. / Tóth, Szilvia Z.; Lorincz, Tamás; Szarka, A.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 29, No. 15, 20.11.2018, p. 1516-1533.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{4a6546dd055e4be9b478a4bfbcea4725,
title = "Concentration Does Matter: The Beneficial and Potentially Harmful Effects of Ascorbate in Humans and Plants",
abstract = "Significance: Ascorbate (Asc) is an essential compound both in animals and plants, mostly due to its reducing properties, thereby playing a role in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and acting as a cofactor in various enzymatic reactions. Recent Advances: Growing number of evidence shows that excessive Asc accumulation may have negative effects on cellular functions both in humans and plants; inter alia it may negatively affect signaling mechanisms, cellular redox status, and contribute to the production of ROS via the Fenton reaction. Critical Issues: Both plants and humans tightly control cellular Asc levels, possibly via biosynthesis, transport, and degradation, to maintain them in an optimum concentration range, which, among other factors, is essential to minimize the potentially harmful effects of Asc. On the contrary, the Fenton reaction induced by a high-dose Asc treatment in humans enables a potential cancer-selective cell death pathway. Future Directions: The elucidation of Asc induced cancer selective cell death mechanisms may give us a tool to apply Asc in cancer therapy. On the contrary, the regulatory mechanisms controlling cellular Asc levels are also to be considered, for example, when aiming at generating crops with elevated Asc levels.",
keywords = "ascorbate, ascorbate biosynthesis, cell death, pharmacologic ascorbate, photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species",
author = "T{\'o}th, {Szilvia Z.} and Tam{\'a}s Lorincz and A. Szarka",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1089/ars.2017.7125",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "1516--1533",
journal = "Antioxidants and Redox Signaling",
issn = "1523-0864",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "15",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Concentration Does Matter

T2 - The Beneficial and Potentially Harmful Effects of Ascorbate in Humans and Plants

AU - Tóth, Szilvia Z.

AU - Lorincz, Tamás

AU - Szarka, A.

PY - 2018/11/20

Y1 - 2018/11/20

N2 - Significance: Ascorbate (Asc) is an essential compound both in animals and plants, mostly due to its reducing properties, thereby playing a role in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and acting as a cofactor in various enzymatic reactions. Recent Advances: Growing number of evidence shows that excessive Asc accumulation may have negative effects on cellular functions both in humans and plants; inter alia it may negatively affect signaling mechanisms, cellular redox status, and contribute to the production of ROS via the Fenton reaction. Critical Issues: Both plants and humans tightly control cellular Asc levels, possibly via biosynthesis, transport, and degradation, to maintain them in an optimum concentration range, which, among other factors, is essential to minimize the potentially harmful effects of Asc. On the contrary, the Fenton reaction induced by a high-dose Asc treatment in humans enables a potential cancer-selective cell death pathway. Future Directions: The elucidation of Asc induced cancer selective cell death mechanisms may give us a tool to apply Asc in cancer therapy. On the contrary, the regulatory mechanisms controlling cellular Asc levels are also to be considered, for example, when aiming at generating crops with elevated Asc levels.

AB - Significance: Ascorbate (Asc) is an essential compound both in animals and plants, mostly due to its reducing properties, thereby playing a role in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and acting as a cofactor in various enzymatic reactions. Recent Advances: Growing number of evidence shows that excessive Asc accumulation may have negative effects on cellular functions both in humans and plants; inter alia it may negatively affect signaling mechanisms, cellular redox status, and contribute to the production of ROS via the Fenton reaction. Critical Issues: Both plants and humans tightly control cellular Asc levels, possibly via biosynthesis, transport, and degradation, to maintain them in an optimum concentration range, which, among other factors, is essential to minimize the potentially harmful effects of Asc. On the contrary, the Fenton reaction induced by a high-dose Asc treatment in humans enables a potential cancer-selective cell death pathway. Future Directions: The elucidation of Asc induced cancer selective cell death mechanisms may give us a tool to apply Asc in cancer therapy. On the contrary, the regulatory mechanisms controlling cellular Asc levels are also to be considered, for example, when aiming at generating crops with elevated Asc levels.

KW - ascorbate

KW - ascorbate biosynthesis

KW - cell death

KW - pharmacologic ascorbate

KW - photosynthesis

KW - reactive oxygen species

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044325069&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044325069&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ars.2017.7125

DO - 10.1089/ars.2017.7125

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28974112

AN - SCOPUS:85044325069

VL - 29

SP - 1516

EP - 1533

JO - Antioxidants and Redox Signaling

JF - Antioxidants and Redox Signaling

SN - 1523-0864

IS - 15

ER -