Comprehensive genetic analysis of a Hungarian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cohort

Kornélia Tripolszki, Piyush Gampawar, Helena Schmidt, Zsófia F. Nagy, Dóra Nagy, Péter Klivényi, József I. Engelhardt, Márta Széll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons. Genetic factors play a key role in ALS, and identifying variants that contribute to ALS susceptibility is an important step toward understanding the etiology of the disease. The frequency of protein altering variants in ALS patients has been extensively investigated in populations of different ethnic origin. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the Hungarian ALS patients, we aimed to detect potentially damaging variants in major and minor ALS genes and in genes related to other neurogenetic disorders. A combination of repeat-sizing of C9orf72 and next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to comprehensively assess genetic variations in 107 Hungarian patients with ALS. Variants in major ALS genes were detected in 36.45% of patients. As a result of repeat sizing, pathogenic repeat expansions in the C9orf72 gene were detected in 10 patients (9.3%). According to the NGS results, the most frequently mutated genes were NEK1 (5.6%), NEFH, SQSTM1 (3.7%), KIF5A, SPG11 (2.8%), ALS2, CCNF, FUS, MATR3, TBK1, and UBQLN2 (1.9%). Furthermore, potentially pathogenic variants were found in GRN and SIGMAR1 genes in single patients. Additional 33 novel or rare known variants were detected in minor ALS genes, as well as 48 variants in genes previously linked to other neurogenetic disorders. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that common pathways in different neurodegenerative diseases may contribute to the development of ALS. While the disease-causing role of several variants identified in this study has previously been established, other variants may show reduced penetrance or may be rare benign variants. Our findings highlight the necessity for large-scale multicenter studies on ALS patients to gain a more accurate view of the genetic pattern of ALS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number732
JournalFrontiers in Genetics
Volume10
Issue numberJUL
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • C9orf72 repeat expansion
  • Genetic heterogeneity
  • Mutation screening
  • Next-generation sequencing
  • Oligogenic inheritance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comprehensive genetic analysis of a Hungarian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cohort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this