Complementarity of interphase and metaphase chromosome analysis in human renal tumors

Sandra R. Wolman, Frederic M. Waldman, Margit Balazs

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Abstract

Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used as a complement to earlier cytogenetic studies of human renal tumors. Chromosome‐specific para‐centromeric probes were applied to cells disaggregated from tissue blocks of tumors, fresh samples from which had yielded cytogenetic results after short‐term culture. Cells were dissociated from thick sections of paraffin‐embedded, formalin‐fixed tissues. Biotin‐labeled probes specific for chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 11, 12, 15, 17, and the Y chromosome were applied in individual cases and were detected by fluorescence. Probes for chromosomes 1, 7, and 17 yielded clean signals with disomic control frequencies near 90%, and 97% of controls showed a single bright spot for the Y chromosome. The 9 cases selected all provided ample numbers of dissociated cells which were hybridized successfully, although some chromosomal signals were poor in individual cases. Abnormal copy numbers of chromosomes 1 and/or 17, not identified in culture, were observed in 7 cases. Trisomy 7 observed in culture was substantiated by FISH on the original tissues, as was loss of the Y, in each of 4 cases, respectively. Our results include limited validation of culture cytogenetics, evidence of selection in culture of tumor subpopulations, and demonstration that interphase cytogenetics by FISH is applicable to archival tissue blocks after prolonged periods of storage. Conditions of culture before harvest and inherent heterogeneity within tumors permit selection for nonrepresentative subgroups within tumors and emphasize the need for multiple approaches to evaluation. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-23
Number of pages7
JournalGenes, Chromosomes and Cancer
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1993

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

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