Comparison of the legal regulations of pesticides and hazardous chemicals in the European Union with emphasis on genotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects

Gy Németh, A. Székács

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pesticide producers cannot ignore their possible obligations under the REACH regulation controlling registration, evaluation and authorization of chemicals, as only the active ingredients (and not the other composites) are exempted from REACH requirements, and more specifically only those quantities of these substances, which are used for plant protection purposes. Registration requirements show similarities with the pesticide authorization process, moreover, the required ecotoxicological tests for pesticide active substances are of the same extent as in the case of industrial substances manufactured/imported in quantities of at least 100 tons per year. A further common characteristic is the higher legal level and more centralized feature of the regulations, leading to the establishment of different authorization zones within the European Union. Although this is considered a favorable trend in case of chemical substances from the aspect of the free movement of goods, possible benefits of zonification regarding pesticides are rather questionable due to the significant differences in ecological characteristics among different areas of the European Union. Studies on genotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects are challenging the fundamentals of toxicology. Conflicting results burden the treatment of endocrine disrupters; laying down the foundations of a testing framework, and legal regulation is still ongoing. Their controversial situation is demonstrated by a few examples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-274
Number of pages24
JournalActa Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2012

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toxic substances
European Union
pesticides
endocrine-disrupting chemicals
toxicology
active ingredients
plant protection
testing

Keywords

  • Biocides
  • Endocrine disruptors
  • European Union
  • Hazardous chemicals
  • Legal regulations
  • Pesticides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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