Comparison of maternal lineage and biogeographic analyses of ancient and modern Hungarian populations

Gyöngyvér Tömöry, Bernadett Csányi, Erika Bogácsi-Szabó, Tibor Kalmár, A. Czibula, Aranka Csosz, Katalin Priskin, Balázs Mende, Péter Langó, C. Stephen Downes, I. Raskó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Hungarian language belongs to the Finno-Ugric branch of the Uralic family, but Hungarian speakers have been living in Central Europe for more than 1000 years, surrounded by speakers of unrelated Indo-European languages. In order to study the continuity in maternal lineage between ancient and modern Hungarian populations, polymorphisms in the HVSI and protein coding regions of mitochondrial DNA sequences of 27 ancient samples (10th-11th centuries), 101 modern Hungarian, and 76 modern Hungarian-speaking Sekler samples from Transylvania were analyzed. The data were compared with sequences derived from 57 European and Asian populations, including Finno-Ugric populations, and statistical analyses were performed to investigate their genetic relationships. Only 2 of 27 ancient Hungarian samples are unambiguously Asian: the rest belong to one of the western Eurasian haplogroups, but some Asian affinities, and the genetic effect of populations who came into contact with ancient Hungarians during their migrations are seen. Strong differences appear when the ancient Hungarian samples are analyzed according to apparent social status, as judged by grave goods. Commoners show a predominance of mtDNA haplotypes and haplogroups (H, R, T), common in west Eurasia, while high-status individuals, presumably conquering Hungarians, show a more heterogeneous haplogroup distribution, with haplogroups (N1a, X) which are present at very low frequencies in modern worldwide populations and are absent in recent Hungarian and Sekler populations. Modern Hungarian-speaking populations seem to be specifically European. Our findings demonstrate that significant genetic differences exist between the ancient and recent Hungarian-speaking populations, and no genetic continuity is seen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-368
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume134
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

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maternal lineage
Hungarian
Mothers
Population
Population Genetics
Mitochondrial DNA
speaking
Language
continuity
mitochondrial DNA
sampling
Transylvania
Haplotypes
Open Reading Frames
Eurasia
language
Central Europe
Central European region
genetic relationships
open reading frames

Keywords

  • 10th-11th century bones
  • Ancient DNA
  • Hungarian conqueror
  • Hungarians
  • mtDNA
  • Seklers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Comparison of maternal lineage and biogeographic analyses of ancient and modern Hungarian populations. / Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Csányi, Bernadett; Bogácsi-Szabó, Erika; Kalmár, Tibor; Czibula, A.; Csosz, Aranka; Priskin, Katalin; Mende, Balázs; Langó, Péter; Downes, C. Stephen; Raskó, I.

In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 134, No. 3, 11.2007, p. 354-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tömöry, G, Csányi, B, Bogácsi-Szabó, E, Kalmár, T, Czibula, A, Csosz, A, Priskin, K, Mende, B, Langó, P, Downes, CS & Raskó, I 2007, 'Comparison of maternal lineage and biogeographic analyses of ancient and modern Hungarian populations', American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 134, no. 3, pp. 354-368. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.20677
Tömöry, Gyöngyvér ; Csányi, Bernadett ; Bogácsi-Szabó, Erika ; Kalmár, Tibor ; Czibula, A. ; Csosz, Aranka ; Priskin, Katalin ; Mende, Balázs ; Langó, Péter ; Downes, C. Stephen ; Raskó, I. / Comparison of maternal lineage and biogeographic analyses of ancient and modern Hungarian populations. In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 2007 ; Vol. 134, No. 3. pp. 354-368.
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AU - Csosz, Aranka

AU - Priskin, Katalin

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