Comparison of feed preference and digestion of three different commercial diets for cats and ferrets

S. Fekete, K. Fodor, A. Proháczik, E. Andrásofszky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diet preference and digestibility experiments were conducted using a total of 10 cats and 10 ferrets. The composition of the three different kinds of dry cat feed was as follows (each data are given in dry matter, DM): (i) normal diet (N): 95.3% DM, 33.7% crude protein (CP), 20.4% ether extract (EE), 37.6% nitrogen-free extract (NFE); (ii) 'light diet' (L): 94.2% DM, 31.6% CP, 10.7% EE, 52.2% NFE; (iii) 'veterinary diet' (D): 94.57% DM, 38.7% CP, 9.6% EE, 47.2% NFE. During the period of the preference test, the average daily dry matter intake (calculated with the mean of the three diets: 94.7% DM) was 98.0, 15.0 and 16.7 g DM in cats and 25.0, 7.3 and 8.1 g DM in ferrets. The preference rates of the three different diets, expressed in percentage of their total consumption, were as follows: 60.4% N (54.4 g DM), 12.4% L (12.1 g DM) and 27.2% D (26.6 g DM) in cats, and 46.2% N (11.6 g DM), 29.9% L (7.5 g DM) and 23.9% D (6.0 g DM) in ferrets. This indicates that cats and ferrets have a clear preference for diets of higher fat content. In all three diets, the digestibility of CP was significantly (p <0.05) lower (70.1 ± 5.4 vs. 75.9 ± 5.8) while that of EE was significantly (p <0.05) higher (95.6 ± 1.5 vs. 89.4 ± 5.3) in ferrets than in cats. The average digestible/metabolizable energy (DE/ME) ratio of feeds turned to be 95.6% for cats and 90.6% for the ferrets. From the data one can conclude that the ferret cannot be used as a model animal for cats either for preference or digestibility studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-202
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
Volume89
Issue number3-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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Ferrets
ferrets
Digestion
Cats
digestion
cats
Diet
diet
extracts
Ether
ethers
crude protein
Nitrogen
digestibility
food choices
Proteins
nitrogen
High Fat Diet
metabolizable energy
dry matter intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Comparison of feed preference and digestion of three different commercial diets for cats and ferrets. / Fekete, S.; Fodor, K.; Proháczik, A.; Andrásofszky, E.

In: Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, Vol. 89, No. 3-6, 04.2005, p. 199-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Diet preference and digestibility experiments were conducted using a total of 10 cats and 10 ferrets. The composition of the three different kinds of dry cat feed was as follows (each data are given in dry matter, DM): (i) normal diet (N): 95.3{\%} DM, 33.7{\%} crude protein (CP), 20.4{\%} ether extract (EE), 37.6{\%} nitrogen-free extract (NFE); (ii) 'light diet' (L): 94.2{\%} DM, 31.6{\%} CP, 10.7{\%} EE, 52.2{\%} NFE; (iii) 'veterinary diet' (D): 94.57{\%} DM, 38.7{\%} CP, 9.6{\%} EE, 47.2{\%} NFE. During the period of the preference test, the average daily dry matter intake (calculated with the mean of the three diets: 94.7{\%} DM) was 98.0, 15.0 and 16.7 g DM in cats and 25.0, 7.3 and 8.1 g DM in ferrets. The preference rates of the three different diets, expressed in percentage of their total consumption, were as follows: 60.4{\%} N (54.4 g DM), 12.4{\%} L (12.1 g DM) and 27.2{\%} D (26.6 g DM) in cats, and 46.2{\%} N (11.6 g DM), 29.9{\%} L (7.5 g DM) and 23.9{\%} D (6.0 g DM) in ferrets. This indicates that cats and ferrets have a clear preference for diets of higher fat content. In all three diets, the digestibility of CP was significantly (p <0.05) lower (70.1 ± 5.4 vs. 75.9 ± 5.8) while that of EE was significantly (p <0.05) higher (95.6 ± 1.5 vs. 89.4 ± 5.3) in ferrets than in cats. The average digestible/metabolizable energy (DE/ME) ratio of feeds turned to be 95.6{\%} for cats and 90.6{\%} for the ferrets. From the data one can conclude that the ferret cannot be used as a model animal for cats either for preference or digestibility studies.",
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N2 - Diet preference and digestibility experiments were conducted using a total of 10 cats and 10 ferrets. The composition of the three different kinds of dry cat feed was as follows (each data are given in dry matter, DM): (i) normal diet (N): 95.3% DM, 33.7% crude protein (CP), 20.4% ether extract (EE), 37.6% nitrogen-free extract (NFE); (ii) 'light diet' (L): 94.2% DM, 31.6% CP, 10.7% EE, 52.2% NFE; (iii) 'veterinary diet' (D): 94.57% DM, 38.7% CP, 9.6% EE, 47.2% NFE. During the period of the preference test, the average daily dry matter intake (calculated with the mean of the three diets: 94.7% DM) was 98.0, 15.0 and 16.7 g DM in cats and 25.0, 7.3 and 8.1 g DM in ferrets. The preference rates of the three different diets, expressed in percentage of their total consumption, were as follows: 60.4% N (54.4 g DM), 12.4% L (12.1 g DM) and 27.2% D (26.6 g DM) in cats, and 46.2% N (11.6 g DM), 29.9% L (7.5 g DM) and 23.9% D (6.0 g DM) in ferrets. This indicates that cats and ferrets have a clear preference for diets of higher fat content. In all three diets, the digestibility of CP was significantly (p <0.05) lower (70.1 ± 5.4 vs. 75.9 ± 5.8) while that of EE was significantly (p <0.05) higher (95.6 ± 1.5 vs. 89.4 ± 5.3) in ferrets than in cats. The average digestible/metabolizable energy (DE/ME) ratio of feeds turned to be 95.6% for cats and 90.6% for the ferrets. From the data one can conclude that the ferret cannot be used as a model animal for cats either for preference or digestibility studies.

AB - Diet preference and digestibility experiments were conducted using a total of 10 cats and 10 ferrets. The composition of the three different kinds of dry cat feed was as follows (each data are given in dry matter, DM): (i) normal diet (N): 95.3% DM, 33.7% crude protein (CP), 20.4% ether extract (EE), 37.6% nitrogen-free extract (NFE); (ii) 'light diet' (L): 94.2% DM, 31.6% CP, 10.7% EE, 52.2% NFE; (iii) 'veterinary diet' (D): 94.57% DM, 38.7% CP, 9.6% EE, 47.2% NFE. During the period of the preference test, the average daily dry matter intake (calculated with the mean of the three diets: 94.7% DM) was 98.0, 15.0 and 16.7 g DM in cats and 25.0, 7.3 and 8.1 g DM in ferrets. The preference rates of the three different diets, expressed in percentage of their total consumption, were as follows: 60.4% N (54.4 g DM), 12.4% L (12.1 g DM) and 27.2% D (26.6 g DM) in cats, and 46.2% N (11.6 g DM), 29.9% L (7.5 g DM) and 23.9% D (6.0 g DM) in ferrets. This indicates that cats and ferrets have a clear preference for diets of higher fat content. In all three diets, the digestibility of CP was significantly (p <0.05) lower (70.1 ± 5.4 vs. 75.9 ± 5.8) while that of EE was significantly (p <0.05) higher (95.6 ± 1.5 vs. 89.4 ± 5.3) in ferrets than in cats. The average digestible/metabolizable energy (DE/ME) ratio of feeds turned to be 95.6% for cats and 90.6% for the ferrets. From the data one can conclude that the ferret cannot be used as a model animal for cats either for preference or digestibility studies.

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