Comparison of Enzymic Saccharification of Starch and Cellulose from Technological and Economic Aspects

K. Réczey, E. László, J. Holló

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enzymatic saccharification of starch in the case of both pure starch and starchy raw materials is a long adopted technology successfully applied on industrial scale for many years. On the other hand, a feasible procedure for enzymatic saccharification of the other glucose polymer, cellulose, has been realized so far only on pilot‐plant scale. A particularly difficult problem is the enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic substances encrusted with lignin. The first step in starch and cellulose saccharification is pretreatment and digestion of the raw material. In the case of starch, this is solved by liquefaction in the presence of thermostable alpha‐amylase in a jet cooker. As a result, starch undergoes partial degradation and liquefaction. In the case of cellulose, the most economical method of pretreatment seems to be “steam‐explosion”, although this does not involve liquefaction either, i. e., saccharification proceeds still in heterogeneous phase. Comparison is made of the energy requirements of digestion of the raw materials and costs of enzymatic saccharification for both substrates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)306-310
Number of pages5
JournalStarch ‐ Stärke
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Saccharification
saccharification
Cellulose
Starch
cellulose
Economics
starch
economics
Liquefaction
raw materials
Raw materials
Digestion
pretreatment
digestion
cookers
Glucans
Lignin
air transportation
energy requirements
lignin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Comparison of Enzymic Saccharification of Starch and Cellulose from Technological and Economic Aspects. / Réczey, K.; László, E.; Holló, J.

In: Starch ‐ Stärke, Vol. 38, No. 9, 1986, p. 306-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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