Comparison of different sampling heads applied for investigation of welding fume

Balázs Berlinger, Miklós Náray, G. Záray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Welding fume samples were collected in two Hungarian welding plants, where different types of steels were welded with metal active gas (MAG) welding. Welding fumes were sampled with "fixed point" and personal sampling techniques applying different sampling heads: Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler and conical inhalable sampler (CIS) for the inhalable aerosol fraction and the Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone for the respirable fraction. When sampled, the welding fume samples were digested with the mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide in a closed vessel microwave digestion system. The Cr, Mn, Ni and Co contents of the solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Iron was analysed only by the ICP-AES method. Metal concentrations of the workplace air were calculated for the three samplers, and the results were compared to each other. The differences of the metal concentrations determined by the different inhalable sampling heads, which were paired during the sampling, proved not to be significant. Therefore, the IOM and CIS heads can be equally used for the sampling of welding fume. Finally, the distributions of metals were determined between the inhalable and respirable fractions. Metal concentrations in the respirable aerosol fraction were 57-98% of the concentrations in the inhalable fraction. These high rates of metals in the respirable aerosol call the attention to the increased health risk of the welding fume.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-30
Number of pages6
JournalMicrochemical Journal
Volume85
Issue number1 SPEC. ISS.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Fumes
Welding
Metals
Sampling
Aerosols
Inductively coupled plasma
Spectrometry
Medicine
Gas welding
Nitric Acid
Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Health risks
Steel
Hydrogen Peroxide
Iron
Microwaves
Air

Keywords

  • CIS
  • Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone
  • Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES)
  • Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)
  • IOM
  • Welding fume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Comparison of different sampling heads applied for investigation of welding fume. / Berlinger, Balázs; Náray, Miklós; Záray, G.

In: Microchemical Journal, Vol. 85, No. 1 SPEC. ISS., 01.2007, p. 25-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berlinger, Balázs ; Náray, Miklós ; Záray, G. / Comparison of different sampling heads applied for investigation of welding fume. In: Microchemical Journal. 2007 ; Vol. 85, No. 1 SPEC. ISS. pp. 25-30.
@article{bd282c6b0ec64937b08f602acac56f22,
title = "Comparison of different sampling heads applied for investigation of welding fume",
abstract = "Welding fume samples were collected in two Hungarian welding plants, where different types of steels were welded with metal active gas (MAG) welding. Welding fumes were sampled with {"}fixed point{"} and personal sampling techniques applying different sampling heads: Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler and conical inhalable sampler (CIS) for the inhalable aerosol fraction and the Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone for the respirable fraction. When sampled, the welding fume samples were digested with the mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide in a closed vessel microwave digestion system. The Cr, Mn, Ni and Co contents of the solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Iron was analysed only by the ICP-AES method. Metal concentrations of the workplace air were calculated for the three samplers, and the results were compared to each other. The differences of the metal concentrations determined by the different inhalable sampling heads, which were paired during the sampling, proved not to be significant. Therefore, the IOM and CIS heads can be equally used for the sampling of welding fume. Finally, the distributions of metals were determined between the inhalable and respirable fractions. Metal concentrations in the respirable aerosol fraction were 57-98{\%} of the concentrations in the inhalable fraction. These high rates of metals in the respirable aerosol call the attention to the increased health risk of the welding fume.",
keywords = "CIS, Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone, Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), IOM, Welding fume",
author = "Bal{\'a}zs Berlinger and Mikl{\'o}s N{\'a}ray and G. Z{\'a}ray",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.microc.2006.05.012",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "25--30",
journal = "Microchemical Journal",
issn = "0026-265X",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1 SPEC. ISS.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of different sampling heads applied for investigation of welding fume

AU - Berlinger, Balázs

AU - Náray, Miklós

AU - Záray, G.

PY - 2007/1

Y1 - 2007/1

N2 - Welding fume samples were collected in two Hungarian welding plants, where different types of steels were welded with metal active gas (MAG) welding. Welding fumes were sampled with "fixed point" and personal sampling techniques applying different sampling heads: Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler and conical inhalable sampler (CIS) for the inhalable aerosol fraction and the Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone for the respirable fraction. When sampled, the welding fume samples were digested with the mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide in a closed vessel microwave digestion system. The Cr, Mn, Ni and Co contents of the solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Iron was analysed only by the ICP-AES method. Metal concentrations of the workplace air were calculated for the three samplers, and the results were compared to each other. The differences of the metal concentrations determined by the different inhalable sampling heads, which were paired during the sampling, proved not to be significant. Therefore, the IOM and CIS heads can be equally used for the sampling of welding fume. Finally, the distributions of metals were determined between the inhalable and respirable fractions. Metal concentrations in the respirable aerosol fraction were 57-98% of the concentrations in the inhalable fraction. These high rates of metals in the respirable aerosol call the attention to the increased health risk of the welding fume.

AB - Welding fume samples were collected in two Hungarian welding plants, where different types of steels were welded with metal active gas (MAG) welding. Welding fumes were sampled with "fixed point" and personal sampling techniques applying different sampling heads: Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler and conical inhalable sampler (CIS) for the inhalable aerosol fraction and the Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone for the respirable fraction. When sampled, the welding fume samples were digested with the mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide in a closed vessel microwave digestion system. The Cr, Mn, Ni and Co contents of the solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Iron was analysed only by the ICP-AES method. Metal concentrations of the workplace air were calculated for the three samplers, and the results were compared to each other. The differences of the metal concentrations determined by the different inhalable sampling heads, which were paired during the sampling, proved not to be significant. Therefore, the IOM and CIS heads can be equally used for the sampling of welding fume. Finally, the distributions of metals were determined between the inhalable and respirable fractions. Metal concentrations in the respirable aerosol fraction were 57-98% of the concentrations in the inhalable fraction. These high rates of metals in the respirable aerosol call the attention to the increased health risk of the welding fume.

KW - CIS

KW - Higgins-Dewell (HD) cyclone

KW - Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES)

KW - Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

KW - IOM

KW - Welding fume

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845456146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845456146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.microc.2006.05.012

DO - 10.1016/j.microc.2006.05.012

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 25

EP - 30

JO - Microchemical Journal

JF - Microchemical Journal

SN - 0026-265X

IS - 1 SPEC. ISS.

ER -