Comparative study of various E. coli strains for biohydrogen production applying response surface methodology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25g/L), 0.63mol H2/molformate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42molH2/molformate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3g/L).

Original languageEnglish
Article number819793
JournalTheScientificWorldJournal [electronic resource]
Volume2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

formic acid
Escherichia coli
Hydrogen
comparative study
hydrogen
Metabolic engineering
Metabolic Engineering
engineering
experimental design
Design of experiments
Fermentation
fermentation
Research Design
substrate
Substrates
response surface methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{91b218b4f35c47549a3dbe7786ff51db,
title = "Comparative study of various E. coli strains for biohydrogen production applying response surface methodology",
abstract = "The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25g/L), 0.63mol H2/molformate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42molH2/molformate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3g/L).",
author = "P{\'e}ter Bakonyi and N. Nemest{\'o}thy and K. B{\'e}lafi-Bak{\'o}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1100/2012/819793",
language = "English",
volume = "2012",
journal = "The Scientific World Journal",
issn = "1537-744X",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparative study of various E. coli strains for biohydrogen production applying response surface methodology

AU - Bakonyi, Péter

AU - Nemestóthy, N.

AU - Bélafi-Bakó, K.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25g/L), 0.63mol H2/molformate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42molH2/molformate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3g/L).

AB - The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25g/L), 0.63mol H2/molformate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42molH2/molformate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3g/L).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861057303&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861057303&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1100/2012/819793

DO - 10.1100/2012/819793

M3 - Article

C2 - 22666156

AN - SCOPUS:84861057303

VL - 2012

JO - The Scientific World Journal

JF - The Scientific World Journal

SN - 1537-744X

M1 - 819793

ER -