Egyetemi hallgatók és nóvérek az orvosi közremúködéssel elkövetett öngyilkossággal kapcsolatos attitúdjének összehasonlító vizsgálata--elsó eredmények.

Translated title of the contribution: Comparative study of the attitudes of students and nurses to physician-assisted suicide--first results

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While the popular media and the professional literature deal with the topic of euthanasia intensively, the problems of physician-assisted suicide received insufficient attention in Hungary. The authors review the most important details of the physician-assisted suicide. A twelve-item scale to measure attitude toward PAS (constructed and validated by G. Domino) was administered to the samples of Hungarian social science, medical students and nurses. The distributions of responses for the 12 items for the social and medical samples are compared and discussed. Also a cross-cultural comparison was made with an American student sample examined by Domino. The social science students who have the fewest personal experiences with serious, or terminally ill patients are the most liberal group, characterised by the most permissive attitudes toward PAS. Nurses who have everyday contact and experience with these patients are the most conservative; they show more or less conclusively the lowest acceptability rate of PAS. The attitudes of medical student's group, of the would-be physicians are between them, and they are the most controversial and ambivalent. Future research is necessary to get more information about attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide.

Translated title of the contributionComparative study of the attitudes of students and nurses to physician-assisted suicide--first results
Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)839-844
Number of pages6
JournalOrvosi hetilap
Volume141
Issue number16
Publication statusPublished - Apr 16 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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