Comparative effects of chloralose anesthesia and sernylan analgesia on cerebral blood flow, co2 responsiveness, and brain metabolism in the baboon

PÉter SÁndor, IstvÁn NyÁry, Martin Reivich, Arisztid G.B. KovÁch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A comparison was made between the effects of two different anesthetics, alpha-D-gluco-chloralose and 1-1-phenylcyclo-hexyl piperidine hydrochloride (Sernylan8), on cerebral blood flow (CBF), brain metabolism and cerebrovascular CO2 responsiveness in primates. The experiments were carried out on immobilized and artificially ventilated baboons. Anesthesia was induced either with 100/mg/kg chloralose (i.p.) or with 1 mg/kg Sernylan (i.m.). CBF in 8 different brain regions was measured by the intra-arterial 133Xe clearance technique. The CO2 responsiveness of the cerebrovascular bed was tested by a gas mixture containing 5% CO2. Chloralose depressed total as well as regional CBF compared to the effect of Sernylan. A significant shift occurred toward lower CBF values in the grey matter while white matter flow was identical in the two groups. Brain Oa consumption was significantly higher during Sernylan analgesia (3.35 ± 0.34 ml/100 g/min) than during chloralose anesthesia (2.42 ± 0.22 ml/100 g/min). There were no differences in glucose uptake, lactate and pyruvate production, or in arterial and cerebral venous blood gases in the two types of anesthesia. The cerebro vascular CO2 sensitivity of the Se rny lan-treated baboons was higher than that of the chloralose-anesthetized animals, in both the grey and white matter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)432-436
Number of pages5
JournalStroke
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1977

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

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