Comparative analyses of epigeic spider assemblages in Northern Hungarian winter wheat fields and their adjacent margins

Ferene Tóth, J. Kiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pitfall trapping was carried out in northern Hungarian winter wheat fields and their adjacent margins during the growing seasons of three consecutive years, 1992-1994. The dominant species of both habitats was the wolf spider Pardosa agrestis (Westring). A total of 8403 adult individuals of 19 families of 149 spider species was identified: 118 species from the winter wheat and 118 from the margins with fewer traps. The efficiency of detecting species by trapping was 90%, according to the Baule-Mitscherlich extrapolation model. Provided that the sampling effort is the same in both habitats, traps in the margin may catch higher number of individuals and species, than traps located within the field. Calculations, however, indicate that the field, with an area more than a hundred times larger than that of the margins, has a higher total number of species. Although the spider species spectrum of the field and of the margin had a considerable overlap, the Renkonen similarity index indicates that the spider fauna of the two types of habitats were different. Spider assemblages of the margins were more diverse (Rényi diversity), than those of the fields. The species richness of epigeic spiders in our Hungarian winter wheat fields was high, and it was increased by the presence of margins. Thus, for the purposes of the protection of our fauna and promotion of integrated pest management, establishment and maintenance of margins is strongly desirable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-248
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Arachnology
Volume27
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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winter wheat
Araneae
trapping
traps
fauna
Pardosa
Agrostis
Lycosidae
integrated pest management
habitats
growing season
species diversity
sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Comparative analyses of epigeic spider assemblages in Northern Hungarian winter wheat fields and their adjacent margins. / Tóth, Ferene; Kiss, J.

In: Journal of Arachnology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1999, p. 241-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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