Combined use of exhaled hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in monitoring asthma

I. Horváth, Louise E. Donnelly, András Kiss, Sergei A. Kharitonov, Sam Lim, K. Fan Chung, Peter J. Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

220 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oxidative stress contributes to airway inflammation and exhaled hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are elevated in asthmatic patients. We determined the concentrations of expired H2O2 and NO in 116 asthmatic (72 stable steroid-naive, 30 stable steroid-treated, and 14 severe steroid- treated unstable patients) and in 35 healthy subjects, and studied the relation between exhaled H2O2 NO, FEV1, airway responsiveness, and eosinophils in induced sputum. Both exhaled H2O2 and NO levels were elevated in steroid-naive asthmatic patients compared with normal subjects (0.72 ± 0.06 versus 0.27 ± 0.04 μM and 29 ± 1.9 versus 6.5 ± 0.32 ppb, respectively; p <0.001) and were reduced in stable steroid-treated patients (0.43 ± 0.08 μM, p <0.05, and 9.9 ± 0.97 ppb, p <0.001). In unstable steroid-treated asthmatics, however, H2O2 levels were increased, but exhaled NO levels were low (0.78 ± 0.16 μM and 6.7 ± 1.0 ppb, respectively). There was a correlation between expired H2O2, sputum eosinophils and airway hyperresponsiveness (methacholine PC20). Exhaled NO also correlated with sputum eosinophils, but not with airway hyperresponsiveness. Our findings indicate that measurement of expired H2O2 and NO in asthmatic patients provides complementary data for monitoring of disease activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1042-1046
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume158
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Hydrogen Peroxide
Nitric Oxide
Asthma
Steroids
Water
Sputum
Eosinophils
Methacholine Chloride
Healthy Volunteers
Oxidative Stress
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Horváth, I., Donnelly, L. E., Kiss, A., Kharitonov, S. A., Lim, S., Chung, K. F., & Barnes, P. J. (1998). Combined use of exhaled hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in monitoring asthma. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 158(4), 1042-1046.

Combined use of exhaled hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in monitoring asthma. / Horváth, I.; Donnelly, Louise E.; Kiss, András; Kharitonov, Sergei A.; Lim, Sam; Chung, K. Fan; Barnes, Peter J.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 158, No. 4, 1998, p. 1042-1046.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horváth, I, Donnelly, LE, Kiss, A, Kharitonov, SA, Lim, S, Chung, KF & Barnes, PJ 1998, 'Combined use of exhaled hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in monitoring asthma', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 158, no. 4, pp. 1042-1046.
Horváth, I. ; Donnelly, Louise E. ; Kiss, András ; Kharitonov, Sergei A. ; Lim, Sam ; Chung, K. Fan ; Barnes, Peter J. / Combined use of exhaled hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in monitoring asthma. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 158, No. 4. pp. 1042-1046.
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