Code ownership

Impact on maintainability

Csaba Faragò, Pèter Hegedȕs, R. Ferenc

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Software systems erode during development, which results in high maintenance costs in the long term. Is it possible to narrow down where exactly this erosion happens? Can we infer the future erosion based on past code changes? In this paper we investigate code ownership and show that a further step of code quality decrease is more likely to happen due to the changes in source files modified by several developers in the past, compared to files with clear ownership. We estimate the level of code ownership and maintainability changes for every commit of three open-source and one proprietary software systems. With the help of Wilcoxon rank test we compare the ownership values of the files in commits resulting maintainability increase with those of decreasing the maintainability. Three tests out of the four gave strong results and the fourth one did not contradict them either. The conclusion of this study is a generalization of the already known fact that common code is more error-prone than those of developed by fewer developers. This result could be utilized in identifying the “hot spots” of the source code from maintainability point of view. A possible IDE plug-in, which indicates the risk of decreasing the maintainability of the source code, could help the architect and warn the developers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages3-19
Number of pages17
Volume9159
ISBN (Print)9783319214122
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event15th International Conference on Computational Science and Its Applications, ICCSA 2015 - Banff, Canada
Duration: Jun 22 2015Jun 25 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9159
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other15th International Conference on Computational Science and Its Applications, ICCSA 2015
CountryCanada
CityBanff
Period6/22/156/25/15

Fingerprint

Maintainability
Erosion
Software System
Wilcoxon Test
Rank Test
Plug-in
Hot Spot
Open Source
Maintenance
Likely
Decrease
Costs
Term
Estimate

Keywords

  • Code ownership
  • ISO/IEC 25010
  • Source code maintainability
  • Wilcoxon test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Faragò, C., Hegedȕs, P., & Ferenc, R. (2015). Code ownership: Impact on maintainability. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 9159, pp. 3-19). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9159). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21413-9_1

Code ownership : Impact on maintainability. / Faragò, Csaba; Hegedȕs, Pèter; Ferenc, R.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9159 Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 3-19 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9159).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Faragò, C, Hegedȕs, P & Ferenc, R 2015, Code ownership: Impact on maintainability. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 9159, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 9159, Springer Verlag, pp. 3-19, 15th International Conference on Computational Science and Its Applications, ICCSA 2015, Banff, Canada, 6/22/15. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21413-9_1
Faragò C, Hegedȕs P, Ferenc R. Code ownership: Impact on maintainability. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9159. Springer Verlag. 2015. p. 3-19. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-21413-9_1
Faragò, Csaba ; Hegedȕs, Pèter ; Ferenc, R. / Code ownership : Impact on maintainability. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9159 Springer Verlag, 2015. pp. 3-19 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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