Cochlear implantation using posterior suprameatal approach

G. Répássy, Marianna Küstel, Magdolna Szonyi, Ádám Enreiter, Ede Birtalan, László Tamás

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

When cochlear implantation was first introduced, the mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy approach was the most frequently used technique to gain access to the middle ear and the cochlea. Since 2000, several authors have routinely used a non-mastoidectomy nonposterior tympanotomy technique, which has undergone several modifications. Alternative surgical techniques for cochlear implantation have recently been introduced, such as endomeatal-alone or suprameatal-alone and combined posterior tympanotomy/endomeatal approaches. The goal of this study was to describe another modification of this less invasive technique to perform cochlear implantation. Cochlear implantations were performed between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2012, in 220 patients through the posterior suprameatal approach. In reviewing our experiences, we have concluded that this approach, which eliminates the need for mastoidectomy, is considered safe, time-efficient, and minimally invasive. The possible pitfalls and the microsurgical relevance of anatomic structures of this technique are discussed in detail. Using this technique, not all classical anatomic orientation points are identified. However, certain landmarks predict the depth and the three-dimensional location of invisible anatomic structures.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberE4
JournalEar, Nose and Throat Journal
Volume97
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2018

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Cochlear Implantation
Cochlea
Middle Ear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Répássy, G., Küstel, M., Szonyi, M., Enreiter, Á., Birtalan, E., & Tamás, L. (2018). Cochlear implantation using posterior suprameatal approach. Ear, Nose and Throat Journal, 97(7), [E4].

Cochlear implantation using posterior suprameatal approach. / Répássy, G.; Küstel, Marianna; Szonyi, Magdolna; Enreiter, Ádám; Birtalan, Ede; Tamás, László.

In: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal, Vol. 97, No. 7, E4, 01.07.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Répássy, G, Küstel, M, Szonyi, M, Enreiter, Á, Birtalan, E & Tamás, L 2018, 'Cochlear implantation using posterior suprameatal approach', Ear, Nose and Throat Journal, vol. 97, no. 7, E4.
Répássy G, Küstel M, Szonyi M, Enreiter Á, Birtalan E, Tamás L. Cochlear implantation using posterior suprameatal approach. Ear, Nose and Throat Journal. 2018 Jul 1;97(7). E4.
Répássy, G. ; Küstel, Marianna ; Szonyi, Magdolna ; Enreiter, Ádám ; Birtalan, Ede ; Tamás, László. / Cochlear implantation using posterior suprameatal approach. In: Ear, Nose and Throat Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 97, No. 7.
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