Clinical significance of circulating immune complexes

Effect of plasmapheresis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The tissue damage in immune complex diseases is most probably caused by actively deposited immune complexes. But even in this disease entity circulating immune complexes may lack the capacity to trigger inflammatory reaction. Potentially pathogenic immune complexes may have beneficial effect. In many clinical disorders the high incidence of circulating immune complexes is most probably secondary to the underlying disease. In sarcoidosis, Crohn's disease and in some other chronic diseases the tissue damage together with an impaired function of the mononuclear phagocytic system is responsible for the circulating immune complexes. The incidence of circulating immune complexes is high in different malignancies. The size and composition of the immune complexes change in the course of the disease. The presence of circulating immune complexes in malignancy is most probably due to their impaired elimination. Methods applied for the detection of circulating immune complexes are all indirect assays and thus reveal presumed immune complexes. Direct techniques of measuring and characterizing immune complexes and methods giving better insight into their in vivo activity are badly needed. Intensive plasmapheresis can be successfully applied in the treatment of some fulminant immune complex diseases and in disseminated melanoma. The dramatic response to plasmapheresis may be due, apart from the removal of circulating immune complexes, to the simultaneous reduction of other plasma constituents with high biologic activity and/or to the replacement of low affinity Ab-s with their high affinity counterparts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-83
Number of pages15
JournalHaematologia
Volume12
Issue number1-4
Publication statusPublished - 1978

Fingerprint

Plasmapheresis
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Immune Complex Diseases
Incidence
Sarcoidosis
Crohn Disease
Melanoma
Neoplasms
Chronic Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Clinical significance of circulating immune complexes : Effect of plasmapheresis. / Hollán, S.

In: Haematologia, Vol. 12, No. 1-4, 1978, p. 69-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0d8c822c4add4165aae8831457f1848f,
title = "Clinical significance of circulating immune complexes: Effect of plasmapheresis",
abstract = "The tissue damage in immune complex diseases is most probably caused by actively deposited immune complexes. But even in this disease entity circulating immune complexes may lack the capacity to trigger inflammatory reaction. Potentially pathogenic immune complexes may have beneficial effect. In many clinical disorders the high incidence of circulating immune complexes is most probably secondary to the underlying disease. In sarcoidosis, Crohn's disease and in some other chronic diseases the tissue damage together with an impaired function of the mononuclear phagocytic system is responsible for the circulating immune complexes. The incidence of circulating immune complexes is high in different malignancies. The size and composition of the immune complexes change in the course of the disease. The presence of circulating immune complexes in malignancy is most probably due to their impaired elimination. Methods applied for the detection of circulating immune complexes are all indirect assays and thus reveal presumed immune complexes. Direct techniques of measuring and characterizing immune complexes and methods giving better insight into their in vivo activity are badly needed. Intensive plasmapheresis can be successfully applied in the treatment of some fulminant immune complex diseases and in disseminated melanoma. The dramatic response to plasmapheresis may be due, apart from the removal of circulating immune complexes, to the simultaneous reduction of other plasma constituents with high biologic activity and/or to the replacement of low affinity Ab-s with their high affinity counterparts.",
author = "S. Holl{\'a}n",
year = "1978",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "69--83",
journal = "Haematologia",
issn = "0017-6559",
publisher = "VSP BV",
number = "1-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical significance of circulating immune complexes

T2 - Effect of plasmapheresis

AU - Hollán, S.

PY - 1978

Y1 - 1978

N2 - The tissue damage in immune complex diseases is most probably caused by actively deposited immune complexes. But even in this disease entity circulating immune complexes may lack the capacity to trigger inflammatory reaction. Potentially pathogenic immune complexes may have beneficial effect. In many clinical disorders the high incidence of circulating immune complexes is most probably secondary to the underlying disease. In sarcoidosis, Crohn's disease and in some other chronic diseases the tissue damage together with an impaired function of the mononuclear phagocytic system is responsible for the circulating immune complexes. The incidence of circulating immune complexes is high in different malignancies. The size and composition of the immune complexes change in the course of the disease. The presence of circulating immune complexes in malignancy is most probably due to their impaired elimination. Methods applied for the detection of circulating immune complexes are all indirect assays and thus reveal presumed immune complexes. Direct techniques of measuring and characterizing immune complexes and methods giving better insight into their in vivo activity are badly needed. Intensive plasmapheresis can be successfully applied in the treatment of some fulminant immune complex diseases and in disseminated melanoma. The dramatic response to plasmapheresis may be due, apart from the removal of circulating immune complexes, to the simultaneous reduction of other plasma constituents with high biologic activity and/or to the replacement of low affinity Ab-s with their high affinity counterparts.

AB - The tissue damage in immune complex diseases is most probably caused by actively deposited immune complexes. But even in this disease entity circulating immune complexes may lack the capacity to trigger inflammatory reaction. Potentially pathogenic immune complexes may have beneficial effect. In many clinical disorders the high incidence of circulating immune complexes is most probably secondary to the underlying disease. In sarcoidosis, Crohn's disease and in some other chronic diseases the tissue damage together with an impaired function of the mononuclear phagocytic system is responsible for the circulating immune complexes. The incidence of circulating immune complexes is high in different malignancies. The size and composition of the immune complexes change in the course of the disease. The presence of circulating immune complexes in malignancy is most probably due to their impaired elimination. Methods applied for the detection of circulating immune complexes are all indirect assays and thus reveal presumed immune complexes. Direct techniques of measuring and characterizing immune complexes and methods giving better insight into their in vivo activity are badly needed. Intensive plasmapheresis can be successfully applied in the treatment of some fulminant immune complex diseases and in disseminated melanoma. The dramatic response to plasmapheresis may be due, apart from the removal of circulating immune complexes, to the simultaneous reduction of other plasma constituents with high biologic activity and/or to the replacement of low affinity Ab-s with their high affinity counterparts.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018045452&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018045452&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 69

EP - 83

JO - Haematologia

JF - Haematologia

SN - 0017-6559

IS - 1-4

ER -