Clinical assessment of a new computerised objective method of measuring facial palsy

G. Kecskés, J. Jóri, B. F. O'Reilly, L. Viharos, L. Rovó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare the results using a new computerised objective method of assessing the degree of facial palsy with the results obtained using traditional clinical methods. Design: Prospective computerised pixel change analysis and clinical evaluation of videos. Setting: Tertiary referral centre. Participants: Subjects with varying degrees of unilateral facial palsy. Methods: Comparison of the results obtained from an objective computerised method, the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale, with the standard subjective clinical methods of the House-Brackmann Scale, Yanagihara, Sunnybrook Grading Scales and the objective clinical Stennert-Limberg-Frentrup Scale. Results: Statistical analysis of the results from the objective computerised system indicated that there is an averagely strong correlation with the results from the House-Brackmann (Spearman's coefficient of 0.64), Sunnybrook (Pearson coefficient of 0.7) and Stennert-Limberg-Frentrup Scale (Pearson coefficient of 0.65), and it therefore has the ability to produce consistent results that agree with traditional clinical methods. It has a strong correlation with the Yanagihara Grading Scale (Pearson coefficient of 0.72) indicating that it may also have the ability to detect and record variations in the different regions of the face. Conclusion: This new computerised objective method of assessing the degree of facial palsy shows promise as a standardised objective method of assessing the degree of facial palsy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-319
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Otolaryngology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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