Climate history inferred from borehole temperatures, data from the Czech Republic

Jan Šafanda, Vladimír Čermák, L. Bodri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The knowledge of the present-day underground temperatures may be important in the assessments of the past climate change. The method of inversion of the temperature-depth records into the ground surface temperature history is briefly introduced by showing an example of synthetic data and illustrated by a review of existing results obtained from the inversion of temperature logs measured in holes in the Czech Republic. Underground temperatures observed in holes of the depth of at least 1000-1500 m seem to confirm the preinstrumental climate pattern of the past several thousand years. Most of shallower temperature records (500-800 m) revealed general warming of climate followed the Little Ice Age of the 17-18th centuries and a pronounced increase of the soil temperatures by at least 1 K since the beginning of this century.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-212
Number of pages16
JournalSurveys in Geophysics
Volume18
Issue number2-3
Publication statusPublished - May 1997

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Czech Republic
boreholes
Boreholes
climate
borehole
histories
history
temperature
Temperature
inversions
Little Ice Age
soil temperature
climate change
surface temperature
Ice
warming
soils
Climate change
ice
heating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Climate history inferred from borehole temperatures, data from the Czech Republic. / Šafanda, Jan; Čermák, Vladimír; Bodri, L.

In: Surveys in Geophysics, Vol. 18, No. 2-3, 05.1997, p. 197-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Šafanda, Jan ; Čermák, Vladimír ; Bodri, L. / Climate history inferred from borehole temperatures, data from the Czech Republic. In: Surveys in Geophysics. 1997 ; Vol. 18, No. 2-3. pp. 197-212.
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