Climate change and soil moisture

A case study

T. Huszár, J. Mika, D. Lóczy, K. Molnár, Á Kertész

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An important aspect of regional climate change is alteration in soil moisture availability. The EPIC (Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator - Sharpley and Williams, 1990) model is applied to estimate soil hydrology consequences in a representative subcatchment (24 km2) of Lake Balaton, Hungary. The study is based on the soil hydrology parameters of the EPIC model, which exhibit a relatively fast response to the climate variations. To specify the regional climate scenario for Hungary in semi-annual time resolution, a statistical approach computing regression between regional and hemispherical mean climate characteristics is employed. The semi-annual scenarios are further refined by applying the principle of geographical analogy. This difference corresponds to a 0.5°K increase of the hemispherical mean temperature, i.e. the climate after 20-40 years of monotonous warming (IPCC, 1996a). Diurnal statistical parameters which correspond to present (base-line) and future climates of the investigated site are finally introduced into the built-in weather generator of the EPIC model. A supplementary factor of variation in soil hydrology is crop-rotation, responsible for half of the standard deviations, as compared to the hypothetical maize monoculture experiment. Climate generated differences in transpiration, soil moisture content, and crop-available water during water stress days. In connection with the assumed warming, there is a general trend towards drought during the vegetation growing period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)905-912
Number of pages8
JournalPhysics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part A: Solid Earth and Geodesy
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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soil moisture
climate change
hydrology
climate
regional climate
warming
soil
climate variation
crop rotation
monoculture
water stress
transpiration
moisture content
drought
maize
weather
erosion
productivity
crop
vegetation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Climate change and soil moisture : A case study. / Huszár, T.; Mika, J.; Lóczy, D.; Molnár, K.; Kertész, Á.

In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part A: Solid Earth and Geodesy, Vol. 24, No. 10, 1999, p. 905-912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huszár, T. ; Mika, J. ; Lóczy, D. ; Molnár, K. ; Kertész, Á. / Climate change and soil moisture : A case study. In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part A: Solid Earth and Geodesy. 1999 ; Vol. 24, No. 10. pp. 905-912.
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