Classification of T-cell and NK-cell neoplasms based on the REAL classification

E. S. Jaffe, L. Krenács, M. Raffeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mature or peripheral T-cell lymphomas are uncommon, accounting for only 10%-15% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The classification of these neoplasms has been controversial. In contrast to B-cell lymphomas, cytologic grade has not been very useful in predicting the clinical course. This finding may result from the generally aggressive clinical course associated with T-cell lymphomas. Prior studies have suggested that stage of disease may be more important than cytologic subtype. Clinical presentation is very important in the classification of T-cell malignancies. For T-cell lymphomas, cytologic features alone are not sufficient to distinguish among disease entities. For example, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) often cannot be distinguished morphologically from HTLV-1-negative T-cell lymphomas. Most extranodal T- cell lymphomas appear to be derived from cytotoxic T cells, which express perforin, TIA-1, and granzyme B. Three broad groups of T-cell malignancies can be identified: (1) leukemic or systemic disease; (2) nodal disease; (3) extranodal disease. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is probably the single most common subtype of T-cell lymphoma. Classical ALCL should be distinguished from primary cutaneous ALCL (CD30+ lymphoproliferative disease of the skin), which is a distinct disease entity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume8
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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T-Cell Lymphoma
Natural Killer Cells
T-Lymphocytes
Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma
Neoplasms
Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma
Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma
Granzymes
Adult T Cell Leukemia Lymphoma
Perforin
Human T-lymphotropic virus 1
B-Cell Lymphoma
Skin Diseases
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Keywords

  • Cytotoxic T cells
  • T-cell lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Classification of T-cell and NK-cell neoplasms based on the REAL classification. / Jaffe, E. S.; Krenács, L.; Raffeld, M.

In: Annals of Oncology, Vol. 8, No. SUPPL. 2, 1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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