Classical geometric illusion effects with nonclassical stimuli: Angular induction from decomposing lines into point arrays

Ernest Greene, J. Fiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Angular induction is the process by which one line segment can bias judgment of orientation and/or collinearity of another segment, and it has been established that the magnitude of error is a determinate function of the relative angle between the two. We examined how these known relationships are affected by decomposing the induction segment into an array of scattered points. The bias that was produced by such arrays was found to be consistent with a formal model of angular induction, with the strength of the effect decreasing as the scatter among the points was increased. This decline in strength was almost linear with a logarithmic transform of the dimensions of the stimulus array. We also evaluated the hypothesis that the induction stimulus is detected by one or more channels-for example, neurons-for which the sensitivity profiles are modeled as Gabor wavelets. The change in induction strength with increasing point scatter was not predicted by a single width of channel. However, the combined activity of an ensemble of channels that differed in width did match the perceptual effects if one also stipulated that each channel would respond maximally to a fine-line stimulus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-589
Number of pages15
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1994

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Classical geometric illusion effects with nonclassical stimuli : Angular induction from decomposing lines into point arrays. / Greene, Ernest; Fiser, J.

In: Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 56, No. 5, 09.1994, p. 575-589.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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