Cigarette smoke-induced proinflammatory alterations in the endothelial phenotype: Role of NAD(P)H oxidase activation

Zsuzsanna Orosz, Anna Csiszar, Nazar Labinskyy, Kira Smith, Pawel M. Kaminski, P. Ferdinándy, Michael S. Wolin, Aracelie Rivera, Zoltan Ungvari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality induced by cigarette smoking exceed those attributable to lung cancer, the molecular basis of smoking-induced vascular injury remains unclear. To test the link between cigarette smoke, oxidative stress, and vascular inflammation, rats were exposed to the smoke of five cigarettes per day (for 1 wk). Also, isolated arteries were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE; 0 to 40 μg/ml, for 6 h) in organoid culture. We found that smoking impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxations of carotid arteries, which could be improved by the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Lucigenin chemiluminescence measurements showed that both smoking and in vitro CSE exposure significantly increased vascular O2 •- production. Dihydroethidine staining showed that increased O2•- generation was present both in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. CSE also increased vascular H2O2 production (dichlorofluorescein fluorescence). Vascular mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and that of inducible nitric oxide synthase was significantly increased by both smoking and CSE exposure, which could be prevented by inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) or scavenging of H2O2. In cultured endothelial cells, CSE elicited NF-κB activation and increased monocyte adhesiveness, which were prevented by apocynin and catalase. Thus we propose that water-soluble components of cigarette smoke (which are likely to be present in the bloodstream in vivo in smokers) activate the vascular NAD(P)H oxidase. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived H2O2 activates NF-κB, leading to proinflammatory alterations in vascular phenotype, which likely promotes development of atherosclerosis, especially if other risk factors are also present.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume292
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

NADPH Oxidase
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Blood Vessels
Phenotype
Smoking
Organoids
Luminescent Measurements
Adhesiveness
Vascular System Injuries
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Interleukin-1
Carotid Arteries
Catalase
Acetylcholine
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Monocytes
Cultured Cells
Interleukin-6
Lung Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Arteriosclerosis
  • Cytokine
  • Endothelial dysfunction
  • Oxidative stress
  • Plaque development
  • Stroke
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Cigarette smoke-induced proinflammatory alterations in the endothelial phenotype : Role of NAD(P)H oxidase activation. / Orosz, Zsuzsanna; Csiszar, Anna; Labinskyy, Nazar; Smith, Kira; Kaminski, Pawel M.; Ferdinándy, P.; Wolin, Michael S.; Rivera, Aracelie; Ungvari, Zoltan.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 292, No. 1, 01.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orosz, Zsuzsanna ; Csiszar, Anna ; Labinskyy, Nazar ; Smith, Kira ; Kaminski, Pawel M. ; Ferdinándy, P. ; Wolin, Michael S. ; Rivera, Aracelie ; Ungvari, Zoltan. / Cigarette smoke-induced proinflammatory alterations in the endothelial phenotype : Role of NAD(P)H oxidase activation. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2007 ; Vol. 292, No. 1.
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AU - Smith, Kira

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AB - Although the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality induced by cigarette smoking exceed those attributable to lung cancer, the molecular basis of smoking-induced vascular injury remains unclear. To test the link between cigarette smoke, oxidative stress, and vascular inflammation, rats were exposed to the smoke of five cigarettes per day (for 1 wk). Also, isolated arteries were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE; 0 to 40 μg/ml, for 6 h) in organoid culture. We found that smoking impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxations of carotid arteries, which could be improved by the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Lucigenin chemiluminescence measurements showed that both smoking and in vitro CSE exposure significantly increased vascular O2 •- production. Dihydroethidine staining showed that increased O2•- generation was present both in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. CSE also increased vascular H2O2 production (dichlorofluorescein fluorescence). Vascular mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and that of inducible nitric oxide synthase was significantly increased by both smoking and CSE exposure, which could be prevented by inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) or scavenging of H2O2. In cultured endothelial cells, CSE elicited NF-κB activation and increased monocyte adhesiveness, which were prevented by apocynin and catalase. Thus we propose that water-soluble components of cigarette smoke (which are likely to be present in the bloodstream in vivo in smokers) activate the vascular NAD(P)H oxidase. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived H2O2 activates NF-κB, leading to proinflammatory alterations in vascular phenotype, which likely promotes development of atherosclerosis, especially if other risk factors are also present.

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