Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity.

Diána Kostyalik, Zita Kátai, Szilvia Vas, Dorottya Pap, Péter Petschner, Eszter Molnár, István Gyertyán, L. Kalmár, L. Tóthfalusi, G. Bagdy

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Abstract

Several multi-target drugs used in treating psychiatric disorders, such as antidepressants (e.g. agomelatine, trazodone, nefazodone, amitriptyline, mirtazapine, mianserin, fluoxetine) or most atypical antipsychotics, have 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptor-blocking property. Adaptive changes in 5-HT2C receptor-mediated functions are suggested to contribute to therapeutic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants after weeks of treatment, at least in part. Beyond the mediation of anxiety and other functions, 5-HT2C receptors are involved in sleep regulation. Anxiety-related adaptive changes caused by antidepressants have been studied extensively, although sleep- and electroencephalography (EEG)-related functional studies are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced functions in different vigilance stages and on quantitative EEG (Q-EEG) spectra. Rats were treated with a single dose of the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at the beginning of passive phase following a 20-day-long SSRI (escitalopram; 10 mg/kg/day, osmotic minipump) or VEHICLE pretreatment. Fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the first 3 h of passive phase. We found that the chronic escitalopram pretreatment attenuated the SB-242084-caused suppression in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). On the contrary, the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced elevations in passive wake and theta (5-9 Hz) power density during active wake and REMS were not affected by the SSRI. In conclusion, attenuation in certain, but not all vigilance- and Q-EEG-related functions induced by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, suggests dissociation in 5-HT2C receptor adaptation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-946
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume232
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C
Citalopram
Serotonin Receptors
REM Sleep
Serotonin
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Electroencephalography
Sleep
Antidepressive Agents
Therapeutics
S 20098
Anxiety
Trazodone
Mianserin
Amitriptyline
Fluoxetine
Electromyography
Therapeutic Uses
Antipsychotic Agents
Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity. / Kostyalik, Diána; Kátai, Zita; Vas, Szilvia; Pap, Dorottya; Petschner, Péter; Molnár, Eszter; Gyertyán, István; Kalmár, L.; Tóthfalusi, L.; Bagdy, G.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 232, No. 3, 2014, p. 935-946.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kostyalik, Diána ; Kátai, Zita ; Vas, Szilvia ; Pap, Dorottya ; Petschner, Péter ; Molnár, Eszter ; Gyertyán, István ; Kalmár, L. ; Tóthfalusi, L. ; Bagdy, G. / Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity. In: Experimental Brain Research. 2014 ; Vol. 232, No. 3. pp. 935-946.
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AU - Vas, Szilvia

AU - Pap, Dorottya

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