Cholecystokinin innervation of the ventral striatum: A morphological and radioimmunological study

L. Záborszky, G. F. Alheid, M. C. Beinfeld, L. E. Eiden, L. Heimer, M. Palkóvits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Immunocytochemistry, radioimmunological assay after surgical cuts, anterograde degeneration and retrograde tracing of fluorescent dyes were used in order to elucidate the cholecystokinin-containing afferents to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle and ventral part of the caudate-putamen). In agreement with the report by Hökfelt et al.,37 midbrain cholecystokinin-containing cells supply the posteromedial parts of the nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle, as well as the subcommissural part of caudate-putamen. Brainstem cholecystokinin afferents also reach more rostral parts of the ventral striatum including the rostrolateral olfactory tubercle. The ascending cholecystokinin axons enter the medial forebrain bundle at the meso-diencephalic border and maintain a rough medial to lateral topography at the caudal diencephalon. A second major cholecystokinin pathway, with possible origin in the piriform and medial prefrontal cortices and/or the amygdala, projects to the subcommissural caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle, the lateral part of the nucleus accumbens and the dorsal part of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis. Finally, the rostral part of the dorsal caudate-putamen receives a substantial cholecystokinin innervation from the basolateral amygdala and possibly from the neocortex. According to radioimmunological data, the descending telencephalic cholecystokinin system accounts for about 60% of all cholecystokinin in the rostral forebrain. The combined use of morphological and biochemical methods provided evidence for a partially overlapping distribution and possible interaction between an ascending brainstem and descending telencephalic cholecystokinin fiber systems within the striatum and related rostral forebrain areas.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuroscience
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1985

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Cholecystokinin
Putamen
Nucleus Accumbens
Telencephalon
Prosencephalon
Brain Stem
Retrograde Degeneration
Medial Forebrain Bundle
Ventral Striatum
Diencephalon
Septal Nuclei
Neocortex
Mesencephalon
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Fluorescent Dyes
Axons
Immunohistochemistry
Olfactory Tubercle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Cholecystokinin innervation of the ventral striatum : A morphological and radioimmunological study. / Záborszky, L.; Alheid, G. F.; Beinfeld, M. C.; Eiden, L. E.; Heimer, L.; Palkóvits, M.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Záborszky, L. ; Alheid, G. F. ; Beinfeld, M. C. ; Eiden, L. E. ; Heimer, L. ; Palkóvits, M. / Cholecystokinin innervation of the ventral striatum : A morphological and radioimmunological study. In: Neuroscience. 1985 ; Vol. 14, No. 2.
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abstract = "Immunocytochemistry, radioimmunological assay after surgical cuts, anterograde degeneration and retrograde tracing of fluorescent dyes were used in order to elucidate the cholecystokinin-containing afferents to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle and ventral part of the caudate-putamen). In agreement with the report by H{\"o}kfelt et al.,37 midbrain cholecystokinin-containing cells supply the posteromedial parts of the nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle, as well as the subcommissural part of caudate-putamen. Brainstem cholecystokinin afferents also reach more rostral parts of the ventral striatum including the rostrolateral olfactory tubercle. The ascending cholecystokinin axons enter the medial forebrain bundle at the meso-diencephalic border and maintain a rough medial to lateral topography at the caudal diencephalon. A second major cholecystokinin pathway, with possible origin in the piriform and medial prefrontal cortices and/or the amygdala, projects to the subcommissural caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle, the lateral part of the nucleus accumbens and the dorsal part of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis. Finally, the rostral part of the dorsal caudate-putamen receives a substantial cholecystokinin innervation from the basolateral amygdala and possibly from the neocortex. According to radioimmunological data, the descending telencephalic cholecystokinin system accounts for about 60{\%} of all cholecystokinin in the rostral forebrain. The combined use of morphological and biochemical methods provided evidence for a partially overlapping distribution and possible interaction between an ascending brainstem and descending telencephalic cholecystokinin fiber systems within the striatum and related rostral forebrain areas.",
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