A Salvia officinalis és néhány rokon faj biológiailag aktív anyagainak kémiai diverzitása

Translated title of the contribution: Chemical diversity of the biological active ingredients of Salvia officinalis and some closely related species

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Comparative studies on the volatile and non-volatile fractions of 6 species, i.e. Salvia officinalis, S. tomentosa, S. fruticosa, S. candelabrum, S. ringens, S. lavandulifolia of the Section Salvia (Lamiaceae) have been carried out. Both fractions provide the chemical pattern matches to the chemotaxonomic character of Subfamily Nepetoideae in Erdtmans two subfamiliar system. S. lavandulifolia had the highest essential oil content, followed by S. fruticosa, S. tomentosa, S. officinalis and S. candelabrum. S. ringens contains volatile oil only in traces. The neurotoxin thujone content was the highest in the S. officinalis oils and in that of S. fruticosa. No thujone was detected in S. lavandulifolia. The other species, e.g.: S. tomentosa contain this compound only in moderate concentrations (less than 10%). Among the non-volatile fractions of the plant ingredients the triterpene ursolic and oleanolic acids had the highest concentration in the leaves. Despite some rare cases, ursolic acid dominates the tritepene fraction. Rosmarinic and caffeic acids were measured in similar concentrations, in all species. As the case of S. officinalis shows, these compounds vary significantly in all organs during the vegetation period. Caffeic acid is also ubiquitous in the genus Salvia but as our data suggest it occurs in an order of magnitude lower concentration than rosmarinic acid. The isolation of phenylethanolid martynoside, though obtained in a rather small concentration, is of great chemotaxonomic significance, as this is the first phenylethanolid type glycoside isolated not only from the Salvia genus but also from the entire Subfamily Nepetoideae. As pheylethanolids are rather common and accumulate in significant concentrations in plants of the Subfamily Lamioideae, our opinion that the chemical differences between the two subfamilies are less quantitative than quantitative, is confirmed. This holds true of other chemical markers like monoterpenes, ursolic and oleanolic acids, caffeic acid and now phenylethanolids. Diterpenes i.e. 7-methyl carnosoate, rosmanol 7- methylether, sageon from S. officinalis, 7α-acetoyroyleanone, 7α- hydroxyroyleanone, royleanone, 6,7-dehydroroyleanone from S. tomentosa and candesalvoquinone, candelabroquinone, 12-O-methylcandesalvone, candesalvone B methyl ester and candelabrone have been isolated from Salvia candelabrum. All of the compounds belong to the abietane type of diterpenoids and have pronounced antioxidant effect.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalActa Pharmaceutica Hungarica
Volume77
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Salvia officinalis
Biodiversity
Salvia
Oleanolic Acid
Diterpenes
Volatile Oils
Abietane Diterpenes
Caffeic Acids
Lamiaceae
Triterpenes
Monoterpenes
Neurotoxins
Glycosides
Oils
Esters
Antioxidants
ursolic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

@article{9c9b1098106d4dcab74708feac6879b3,
title = "A Salvia officinalis {\'e}s n{\'e}h{\'a}ny rokon faj biol{\'o}giailag akt{\'i}v anyagainak k{\'e}miai diverzit{\'a}sa",
abstract = "Comparative studies on the volatile and non-volatile fractions of 6 species, i.e. Salvia officinalis, S. tomentosa, S. fruticosa, S. candelabrum, S. ringens, S. lavandulifolia of the Section Salvia (Lamiaceae) have been carried out. Both fractions provide the chemical pattern matches to the chemotaxonomic character of Subfamily Nepetoideae in Erdtmans two subfamiliar system. S. lavandulifolia had the highest essential oil content, followed by S. fruticosa, S. tomentosa, S. officinalis and S. candelabrum. S. ringens contains volatile oil only in traces. The neurotoxin thujone content was the highest in the S. officinalis oils and in that of S. fruticosa. No thujone was detected in S. lavandulifolia. The other species, e.g.: S. tomentosa contain this compound only in moderate concentrations (less than 10{\%}). Among the non-volatile fractions of the plant ingredients the triterpene ursolic and oleanolic acids had the highest concentration in the leaves. Despite some rare cases, ursolic acid dominates the tritepene fraction. Rosmarinic and caffeic acids were measured in similar concentrations, in all species. As the case of S. officinalis shows, these compounds vary significantly in all organs during the vegetation period. Caffeic acid is also ubiquitous in the genus Salvia but as our data suggest it occurs in an order of magnitude lower concentration than rosmarinic acid. The isolation of phenylethanolid martynoside, though obtained in a rather small concentration, is of great chemotaxonomic significance, as this is the first phenylethanolid type glycoside isolated not only from the Salvia genus but also from the entire Subfamily Nepetoideae. As pheylethanolids are rather common and accumulate in significant concentrations in plants of the Subfamily Lamioideae, our opinion that the chemical differences between the two subfamilies are less quantitative than quantitative, is confirmed. This holds true of other chemical markers like monoterpenes, ursolic and oleanolic acids, caffeic acid and now phenylethanolids. Diterpenes i.e. 7-methyl carnosoate, rosmanol 7- methylether, sageon from S. officinalis, 7α-acetoyroyleanone, 7α- hydroxyroyleanone, royleanone, 6,7-dehydroroyleanone from S. tomentosa and candesalvoquinone, candelabroquinone, 12-O-methylcandesalvone, candesalvone B methyl ester and candelabrone have been isolated from Salvia candelabrum. All of the compounds belong to the abietane type of diterpenoids and have pronounced antioxidant effect.",
author = "I. M{\'a}th{\'e} and J. Hohmann and G. Janics{\'a}k and G{\'a}bor Nagy and D. R{\'e}dei",
year = "2007",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "77",
pages = "37--45",
journal = "Acta Pharmaceutica Hungarica",
issn = "0001-6659",
publisher = "Magyar Gyogyszereszeti Tarsasag",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Salvia officinalis és néhány rokon faj biológiailag aktív anyagainak kémiai diverzitása

AU - Máthé, I.

AU - Hohmann, J.

AU - Janicsák, G.

AU - Nagy, Gábor

AU - Rédei, D.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Comparative studies on the volatile and non-volatile fractions of 6 species, i.e. Salvia officinalis, S. tomentosa, S. fruticosa, S. candelabrum, S. ringens, S. lavandulifolia of the Section Salvia (Lamiaceae) have been carried out. Both fractions provide the chemical pattern matches to the chemotaxonomic character of Subfamily Nepetoideae in Erdtmans two subfamiliar system. S. lavandulifolia had the highest essential oil content, followed by S. fruticosa, S. tomentosa, S. officinalis and S. candelabrum. S. ringens contains volatile oil only in traces. The neurotoxin thujone content was the highest in the S. officinalis oils and in that of S. fruticosa. No thujone was detected in S. lavandulifolia. The other species, e.g.: S. tomentosa contain this compound only in moderate concentrations (less than 10%). Among the non-volatile fractions of the plant ingredients the triterpene ursolic and oleanolic acids had the highest concentration in the leaves. Despite some rare cases, ursolic acid dominates the tritepene fraction. Rosmarinic and caffeic acids were measured in similar concentrations, in all species. As the case of S. officinalis shows, these compounds vary significantly in all organs during the vegetation period. Caffeic acid is also ubiquitous in the genus Salvia but as our data suggest it occurs in an order of magnitude lower concentration than rosmarinic acid. The isolation of phenylethanolid martynoside, though obtained in a rather small concentration, is of great chemotaxonomic significance, as this is the first phenylethanolid type glycoside isolated not only from the Salvia genus but also from the entire Subfamily Nepetoideae. As pheylethanolids are rather common and accumulate in significant concentrations in plants of the Subfamily Lamioideae, our opinion that the chemical differences between the two subfamilies are less quantitative than quantitative, is confirmed. This holds true of other chemical markers like monoterpenes, ursolic and oleanolic acids, caffeic acid and now phenylethanolids. Diterpenes i.e. 7-methyl carnosoate, rosmanol 7- methylether, sageon from S. officinalis, 7α-acetoyroyleanone, 7α- hydroxyroyleanone, royleanone, 6,7-dehydroroyleanone from S. tomentosa and candesalvoquinone, candelabroquinone, 12-O-methylcandesalvone, candesalvone B methyl ester and candelabrone have been isolated from Salvia candelabrum. All of the compounds belong to the abietane type of diterpenoids and have pronounced antioxidant effect.

AB - Comparative studies on the volatile and non-volatile fractions of 6 species, i.e. Salvia officinalis, S. tomentosa, S. fruticosa, S. candelabrum, S. ringens, S. lavandulifolia of the Section Salvia (Lamiaceae) have been carried out. Both fractions provide the chemical pattern matches to the chemotaxonomic character of Subfamily Nepetoideae in Erdtmans two subfamiliar system. S. lavandulifolia had the highest essential oil content, followed by S. fruticosa, S. tomentosa, S. officinalis and S. candelabrum. S. ringens contains volatile oil only in traces. The neurotoxin thujone content was the highest in the S. officinalis oils and in that of S. fruticosa. No thujone was detected in S. lavandulifolia. The other species, e.g.: S. tomentosa contain this compound only in moderate concentrations (less than 10%). Among the non-volatile fractions of the plant ingredients the triterpene ursolic and oleanolic acids had the highest concentration in the leaves. Despite some rare cases, ursolic acid dominates the tritepene fraction. Rosmarinic and caffeic acids were measured in similar concentrations, in all species. As the case of S. officinalis shows, these compounds vary significantly in all organs during the vegetation period. Caffeic acid is also ubiquitous in the genus Salvia but as our data suggest it occurs in an order of magnitude lower concentration than rosmarinic acid. The isolation of phenylethanolid martynoside, though obtained in a rather small concentration, is of great chemotaxonomic significance, as this is the first phenylethanolid type glycoside isolated not only from the Salvia genus but also from the entire Subfamily Nepetoideae. As pheylethanolids are rather common and accumulate in significant concentrations in plants of the Subfamily Lamioideae, our opinion that the chemical differences between the two subfamilies are less quantitative than quantitative, is confirmed. This holds true of other chemical markers like monoterpenes, ursolic and oleanolic acids, caffeic acid and now phenylethanolids. Diterpenes i.e. 7-methyl carnosoate, rosmanol 7- methylether, sageon from S. officinalis, 7α-acetoyroyleanone, 7α- hydroxyroyleanone, royleanone, 6,7-dehydroroyleanone from S. tomentosa and candesalvoquinone, candelabroquinone, 12-O-methylcandesalvone, candesalvone B methyl ester and candelabrone have been isolated from Salvia candelabrum. All of the compounds belong to the abietane type of diterpenoids and have pronounced antioxidant effect.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247263686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247263686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 17518111

AN - SCOPUS:34247263686

VL - 77

SP - 37

EP - 45

JO - Acta Pharmaceutica Hungarica

JF - Acta Pharmaceutica Hungarica

SN - 0001-6659

IS - 1

ER -