Chemical changes of wood during steaming measured by IR spectroscopy

Robert Nemeth, Callum A S Hill, Peter Takats, L. Tolvaj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Black locust, poplar and spruce samples were steamed at 80°C and 120°C for 48 hours. IR difference spectra and the CIE Lab colour coordinates were measured for determining the chemical changes caused by the steaming. Steaming at 80°C caused only small changes in both IR spectra and colour. But steaming at 120°C produced intensive colour change and well-visible changes in IR spectra. The guaiacyl lignin in hardwoods underwent slight degradation but in spruce suffered substantial degradation during steaming at 120°C. The syringyl lignin absorbing around 1600 cm−1 did not show any changes, indicating that it is more stable to steaming than guaiacyl lignin. The absorption decrease at 1175 cm−1 indicated the cleavage of ether linkage in cellulose and hemicelluloses at both steaming temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalWood Material Science and Engineering
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Sep 19 2014

Fingerprint

Lignin
Infrared spectroscopy
Wood
Color
Degradation
Hardwoods
Cellulose
Ether
Ethers
Temperature

Keywords

  • hemicelluloses
  • infrared spectroscopy
  • lignin
  • steaming
  • Wood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Chemical changes of wood during steaming measured by IR spectroscopy. / Nemeth, Robert; Hill, Callum A S; Takats, Peter; Tolvaj, L.

In: Wood Material Science and Engineering, 19.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{721cc778b43043a08fb55e46d7aee91d,
title = "Chemical changes of wood during steaming measured by IR spectroscopy",
abstract = "Black locust, poplar and spruce samples were steamed at 80°C and 120°C for 48 hours. IR difference spectra and the CIE Lab colour coordinates were measured for determining the chemical changes caused by the steaming. Steaming at 80°C caused only small changes in both IR spectra and colour. But steaming at 120°C produced intensive colour change and well-visible changes in IR spectra. The guaiacyl lignin in hardwoods underwent slight degradation but in spruce suffered substantial degradation during steaming at 120°C. The syringyl lignin absorbing around 1600 cm−1 did not show any changes, indicating that it is more stable to steaming than guaiacyl lignin. The absorption decrease at 1175 cm−1 indicated the cleavage of ether linkage in cellulose and hemicelluloses at both steaming temperatures.",
keywords = "hemicelluloses, infrared spectroscopy, lignin, steaming, Wood",
author = "Robert Nemeth and Hill, {Callum A S} and Peter Takats and L. Tolvaj",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1080/17480272.2014.961169",
language = "English",
journal = "Wood Material Science and Engineering",
issn = "1748-0272",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chemical changes of wood during steaming measured by IR spectroscopy

AU - Nemeth, Robert

AU - Hill, Callum A S

AU - Takats, Peter

AU - Tolvaj, L.

PY - 2014/9/19

Y1 - 2014/9/19

N2 - Black locust, poplar and spruce samples were steamed at 80°C and 120°C for 48 hours. IR difference spectra and the CIE Lab colour coordinates were measured for determining the chemical changes caused by the steaming. Steaming at 80°C caused only small changes in both IR spectra and colour. But steaming at 120°C produced intensive colour change and well-visible changes in IR spectra. The guaiacyl lignin in hardwoods underwent slight degradation but in spruce suffered substantial degradation during steaming at 120°C. The syringyl lignin absorbing around 1600 cm−1 did not show any changes, indicating that it is more stable to steaming than guaiacyl lignin. The absorption decrease at 1175 cm−1 indicated the cleavage of ether linkage in cellulose and hemicelluloses at both steaming temperatures.

AB - Black locust, poplar and spruce samples were steamed at 80°C and 120°C for 48 hours. IR difference spectra and the CIE Lab colour coordinates were measured for determining the chemical changes caused by the steaming. Steaming at 80°C caused only small changes in both IR spectra and colour. But steaming at 120°C produced intensive colour change and well-visible changes in IR spectra. The guaiacyl lignin in hardwoods underwent slight degradation but in spruce suffered substantial degradation during steaming at 120°C. The syringyl lignin absorbing around 1600 cm−1 did not show any changes, indicating that it is more stable to steaming than guaiacyl lignin. The absorption decrease at 1175 cm−1 indicated the cleavage of ether linkage in cellulose and hemicelluloses at both steaming temperatures.

KW - hemicelluloses

KW - infrared spectroscopy

KW - lignin

KW - steaming

KW - Wood

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908081602&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908081602&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17480272.2014.961169

DO - 10.1080/17480272.2014.961169

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84908081602

JO - Wood Material Science and Engineering

JF - Wood Material Science and Engineering

SN - 1748-0272

ER -