Charge deposition, redistribution, and decay properties of insulating surfaces obtained from guiding of low-energy ions through capillaries

R. D. Dubois, K. Tőkési, E. Giglio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the transmission of single charged 1-keV Ar ions through a cylindrical glass capillary of macroscopic dimensions. From quantitative measurements of the incoming and transmitted ion currents, combined with a detailed analysis, the amount of beam entering the capillary was determined. This, combined with the measured transmitted currents, was used to determine the amount of charge deposited on the inner wall of the capillary which produces the guiding electric field. We show experimental results for fully, and partially, discharged conditions of the time evolution of the guided beam intensity following a wide range of times during which the capillary was allowed to discharge in order to provide information about the insulating surface charging and discharging rates. Combining our recent theoretical model describing the charge patch dynamics with these data, it is shown that the model is consistent with the experimental transmission curve data measured after the capillary was allowed to discharge for times ranging from 5 to 1000 s or longer and for injected currents that differed by a factor of 50. In contrast, models which do not include a dynamic rearrangement of charge along the surface prior to decay were found to be inconsistent with our experimental measurements. Additional data about the time dependences of the fraction of the injected beam which is transmitted as a function of injected beam current when transmission through the capillary is inhibited due to blocking are also presented. These data have a temporal dependence consistent with our model predictions that blocking occurs when the total capillary charge, i.e., the capillary potential, reaches a certain value.

Original languageEnglish
Article number062704
JournalPhysical Review A
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 12 2019

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decay
ions
energy
beam currents
ion currents
time dependence
charging
electric fields
glass
curves
predictions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

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Charge deposition, redistribution, and decay properties of insulating surfaces obtained from guiding of low-energy ions through capillaries. / Dubois, R. D.; Tőkési, K.; Giglio, E.

In: Physical Review A, Vol. 99, No. 6, 062704, 12.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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