Characterization and zoonotic potential of endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in humans and animals in Hungary

G. Reuter, Domonka Fodor, Petra Forgách, Andrea Kátai, György Szucs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute, fecally transmitted hepatitis in developing countries. Identification of HEV in indigenous human infection and in domestic pig raising the possibility that HEV infection is also a zoonosis. Objectives/study design: Molecular detection and epidemiology of HEV in humans (South-East Hungary) with acute hepatitis and in domestic (pig, cattle) and wild (boar and roe-deer) animals (countrywide) by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results: Between 2001 and 2006, a total of 116 (9.6%) of 1203 human sera were positive by HEV IgM ELISA and 13 (24.5%) of 53 samples were also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. Forty-two (27.3%) of 154, 11 (34.4%) of 32 and 9 (12.2%) of 74 samples were RT-PCR-positive from swine (feces: 22.7%; liver: 30.8%), roe-deer (liver) and wild boar (liver), respectively. Except for an imported infection caused by genotype 1, 19 sequences (human: 12, swine: 4, roe-deer: 1, wild boar: 2) belong to genotype 3 HEV. Genetically identical strains were detected in human and roe-deer and in 2 other human clusters. Conclusions: HEV is an endemic agent in Hungary. Consumption of raw or undercooked meat-products is one of the possible sources of the indigenous HEV infections. Cross-species infection with genotype 3 HEV potentially involves a food-borne transmission route in Hungary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-281
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

Hepatitis E virus
Hungary
Zoonoses
Sus scrofa
Deer
Genotype
Virus Diseases
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Hepatitis
Liver
Swine
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Meat Products
Molecular Epidemiology
Cross Infection
Infection
Feces
Developing Countries
Immunoglobulin M
Food

Keywords

  • Endemic
  • Food-borne
  • Hepatitis E virus
  • Zoonosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Characterization and zoonotic potential of endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in humans and animals in Hungary. / Reuter, G.; Fodor, Domonka; Forgách, Petra; Kátai, Andrea; Szucs, György.

In: Journal of Clinical Virology, Vol. 44, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 277-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reuter, G. ; Fodor, Domonka ; Forgách, Petra ; Kátai, Andrea ; Szucs, György. / Characterization and zoonotic potential of endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in humans and animals in Hungary. In: Journal of Clinical Virology. 2009 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 277-281.
@article{7c5ae19f1b674f14b64a368d4931b467,
title = "Characterization and zoonotic potential of endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in humans and animals in Hungary",
abstract = "Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute, fecally transmitted hepatitis in developing countries. Identification of HEV in indigenous human infection and in domestic pig raising the possibility that HEV infection is also a zoonosis. Objectives/study design: Molecular detection and epidemiology of HEV in humans (South-East Hungary) with acute hepatitis and in domestic (pig, cattle) and wild (boar and roe-deer) animals (countrywide) by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results: Between 2001 and 2006, a total of 116 (9.6{\%}) of 1203 human sera were positive by HEV IgM ELISA and 13 (24.5{\%}) of 53 samples were also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. Forty-two (27.3{\%}) of 154, 11 (34.4{\%}) of 32 and 9 (12.2{\%}) of 74 samples were RT-PCR-positive from swine (feces: 22.7{\%}; liver: 30.8{\%}), roe-deer (liver) and wild boar (liver), respectively. Except for an imported infection caused by genotype 1, 19 sequences (human: 12, swine: 4, roe-deer: 1, wild boar: 2) belong to genotype 3 HEV. Genetically identical strains were detected in human and roe-deer and in 2 other human clusters. Conclusions: HEV is an endemic agent in Hungary. Consumption of raw or undercooked meat-products is one of the possible sources of the indigenous HEV infections. Cross-species infection with genotype 3 HEV potentially involves a food-borne transmission route in Hungary.",
keywords = "Endemic, Food-borne, Hepatitis E virus, Zoonosis",
author = "G. Reuter and Domonka Fodor and Petra Forg{\'a}ch and Andrea K{\'a}tai and Gy{\"o}rgy Szucs",
year = "2009",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcv.2009.01.008",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "277--281",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Virology",
issn = "1386-6532",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterization and zoonotic potential of endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) strains in humans and animals in Hungary

AU - Reuter, G.

AU - Fodor, Domonka

AU - Forgách, Petra

AU - Kátai, Andrea

AU - Szucs, György

PY - 2009/4

Y1 - 2009/4

N2 - Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute, fecally transmitted hepatitis in developing countries. Identification of HEV in indigenous human infection and in domestic pig raising the possibility that HEV infection is also a zoonosis. Objectives/study design: Molecular detection and epidemiology of HEV in humans (South-East Hungary) with acute hepatitis and in domestic (pig, cattle) and wild (boar and roe-deer) animals (countrywide) by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results: Between 2001 and 2006, a total of 116 (9.6%) of 1203 human sera were positive by HEV IgM ELISA and 13 (24.5%) of 53 samples were also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. Forty-two (27.3%) of 154, 11 (34.4%) of 32 and 9 (12.2%) of 74 samples were RT-PCR-positive from swine (feces: 22.7%; liver: 30.8%), roe-deer (liver) and wild boar (liver), respectively. Except for an imported infection caused by genotype 1, 19 sequences (human: 12, swine: 4, roe-deer: 1, wild boar: 2) belong to genotype 3 HEV. Genetically identical strains were detected in human and roe-deer and in 2 other human clusters. Conclusions: HEV is an endemic agent in Hungary. Consumption of raw or undercooked meat-products is one of the possible sources of the indigenous HEV infections. Cross-species infection with genotype 3 HEV potentially involves a food-borne transmission route in Hungary.

AB - Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute, fecally transmitted hepatitis in developing countries. Identification of HEV in indigenous human infection and in domestic pig raising the possibility that HEV infection is also a zoonosis. Objectives/study design: Molecular detection and epidemiology of HEV in humans (South-East Hungary) with acute hepatitis and in domestic (pig, cattle) and wild (boar and roe-deer) animals (countrywide) by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results: Between 2001 and 2006, a total of 116 (9.6%) of 1203 human sera were positive by HEV IgM ELISA and 13 (24.5%) of 53 samples were also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. Forty-two (27.3%) of 154, 11 (34.4%) of 32 and 9 (12.2%) of 74 samples were RT-PCR-positive from swine (feces: 22.7%; liver: 30.8%), roe-deer (liver) and wild boar (liver), respectively. Except for an imported infection caused by genotype 1, 19 sequences (human: 12, swine: 4, roe-deer: 1, wild boar: 2) belong to genotype 3 HEV. Genetically identical strains were detected in human and roe-deer and in 2 other human clusters. Conclusions: HEV is an endemic agent in Hungary. Consumption of raw or undercooked meat-products is one of the possible sources of the indigenous HEV infections. Cross-species infection with genotype 3 HEV potentially involves a food-borne transmission route in Hungary.

KW - Endemic

KW - Food-borne

KW - Hepatitis E virus

KW - Zoonosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=62949123321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=62949123321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcv.2009.01.008

DO - 10.1016/j.jcv.2009.01.008

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 277

EP - 281

JO - Journal of Clinical Virology

JF - Journal of Clinical Virology

SN - 1386-6532

IS - 4

ER -