Chapter 8: Production and Signaling of Methane

M. Borós, F. Keppler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Methanogenesis has been associated exclusively with anoxic environments and the activity of prokaryotes, but there is convincing evidence for alternative pathways of biological methane formation in the aerobic biosphere, including plants, fungi, algae, and animals. Once generated by anaerobe microbes or released by a non-archaeal process, methane is widely considered to be biologically inactive. However, apart from the data on the effects of endogenously generated methane, several studies have reported that exogenous methane influences the key regulatory mechanisms and cellular pathways involved in oxidative and nitrosative stress responses in antigen-dependent and antigen-independent models of inflammation. This chapter reviews the available literature on methane-producing processes in eukaryotes and the interactions of methane with other biological gases, and summarizes the most relevant results that establish the bioactive role of methane in eukaryotic biological systems. These data collectively imply that methane liberation and effectiveness in eukaryotes are both linked to hypoxic events and redox regulation, and support the notion that methane plays important signaling roles in the mammalian physiology and pathophysiology.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRSC Metallobiology
EditorsRui Wang
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry
Pages192-234
Number of pages43
Edition12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameRSC Metallobiology
Number12
Volume2018-January
ISSN (Print)2045-547X

Fingerprint

Methane
Eukaryota
Antigens
Physiology
Biological systems
Algae
Fungi
Oxidation-Reduction
Animals
Oxidative Stress
Gases
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Borós, M., & Keppler, F. (2018). Chapter 8: Production and Signaling of Methane. In R. Wang (Ed.), RSC Metallobiology (12 ed., pp. 192-234). (RSC Metallobiology; Vol. 2018-January, No. 12). Royal Society of Chemistry. https://doi.org/10.1039/9781788013000-00192

Chapter 8 : Production and Signaling of Methane. / Borós, M.; Keppler, F.

RSC Metallobiology. ed. / Rui Wang. 12. ed. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018. p. 192-234 (RSC Metallobiology; Vol. 2018-January, No. 12).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Borós, M & Keppler, F 2018, Chapter 8: Production and Signaling of Methane. in R Wang (ed.), RSC Metallobiology. 12 edn, RSC Metallobiology, no. 12, vol. 2018-January, Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 192-234. https://doi.org/10.1039/9781788013000-00192
Borós M, Keppler F. Chapter 8: Production and Signaling of Methane. In Wang R, editor, RSC Metallobiology. 12 ed. Royal Society of Chemistry. 2018. p. 192-234. (RSC Metallobiology; 12). https://doi.org/10.1039/9781788013000-00192
Borós, M. ; Keppler, F. / Chapter 8 : Production and Signaling of Methane. RSC Metallobiology. editor / Rui Wang. 12. ed. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018. pp. 192-234 (RSC Metallobiology; 12).
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