CHAPTER 1: Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures

I. Horváth, Edit Cséfalvay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Although the ecological footprint was perhaps the first green metric, the atom economy and E-factor have become the key metrics of green chemistry by providing the mass balance of chemical reactions and processes at the molecular level. Sustainability was poorly defined originally, since the key requisite to accurately forecast the needs of future generations remains difficult to pinpoint. Consequently, sustainability was replaced with suitability by many stake holders, as they had vested and/or conflicts of interests to label suitable developments sustainable. The sustainable development goals recently introduced by the United Nations seem to serve as a 'roadmap to happiness' instead of metrics. A simple and independent definition of sustainability was recently provided: Nature's resources, including energy, should be used at a rate at which they can be replaced naturally, and the generation of wastes cannot be faster than the rate of their remediation by Nature. The ethanol equivalent, the sustainability values of resource replacement and fate of waste, and the sustainability indicator have been recently defined to measure the sustainability of biomass-based carbon-chemicals and renewable energy. The production of ethylene, propylene, toluene, xylenes, styrene, and ethylene oxides cannot be sustainable due to the limited amount of bioethanol. The required volume of corn and the corresponding size of land are only enough to replace one sixth of fossil resources in the USA, EU, and China, and practically insufficient in Canada and the Russian Federation. Until the utilization of electricity becomes practical and economical in aviation, biomass-based liquid fuels are the sustainable alternative.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRubber Recycling
Subtitle of host publicationChallenges and Developments
EditorsRoberto Ballini
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry
Pages1-19
Number of pages19
Edition61
ISBN (Electronic)9781782629948, 9781788010849, 9781788015127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameRSC Green Chemistry
Number61
Volume2019-January
ISSN (Print)1757-7039
ISSN (Electronic)1757-7047

Fingerprint

styrene oxide
Conservation of Natural Resources
Biomass
Sustainable development
Chemical Phenomena
sustainability
Renewable Energy
Aviation
Ethylene Oxide
Conflict of Interest
Xylenes
Electricity
Happiness
United Nations
Social Responsibility
Toluene
Zea mays
Canada
China
Ethanol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Horváth, I., & Cséfalvay, E. (2019). CHAPTER 1: Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures. In R. Ballini (Ed.), Rubber Recycling: Challenges and Developments (61 ed., pp. 1-19). (RSC Green Chemistry; Vol. 2019-January, No. 61). Royal Society of Chemistry. https://doi.org/10.1039/9781788016131-00001

CHAPTER 1 : Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures. / Horváth, I.; Cséfalvay, Edit.

Rubber Recycling: Challenges and Developments. ed. / Roberto Ballini. 61. ed. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019. p. 1-19 (RSC Green Chemistry; Vol. 2019-January, No. 61).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Horváth, I & Cséfalvay, E 2019, CHAPTER 1: Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures. in R Ballini (ed.), Rubber Recycling: Challenges and Developments. 61 edn, RSC Green Chemistry, no. 61, vol. 2019-January, Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1039/9781788016131-00001
Horváth I, Cséfalvay E. CHAPTER 1: Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures. In Ballini R, editor, Rubber Recycling: Challenges and Developments. 61 ed. Royal Society of Chemistry. 2019. p. 1-19. (RSC Green Chemistry; 61). https://doi.org/10.1039/9781788016131-00001
Horváth, I. ; Cséfalvay, Edit. / CHAPTER 1 : Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures. Rubber Recycling: Challenges and Developments. editor / Roberto Ballini. 61. ed. Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019. pp. 1-19 (RSC Green Chemistry; 61).
@inbook{4af91336fac1431ab0b1c3a44626fb19,
title = "CHAPTER 1: Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures",
abstract = "Although the ecological footprint was perhaps the first green metric, the atom economy and E-factor have become the key metrics of green chemistry by providing the mass balance of chemical reactions and processes at the molecular level. Sustainability was poorly defined originally, since the key requisite to accurately forecast the needs of future generations remains difficult to pinpoint. Consequently, sustainability was replaced with suitability by many stake holders, as they had vested and/or conflicts of interests to label suitable developments sustainable. The sustainable development goals recently introduced by the United Nations seem to serve as a 'roadmap to happiness' instead of metrics. A simple and independent definition of sustainability was recently provided: Nature's resources, including energy, should be used at a rate at which they can be replaced naturally, and the generation of wastes cannot be faster than the rate of their remediation by Nature. The ethanol equivalent, the sustainability values of resource replacement and fate of waste, and the sustainability indicator have been recently defined to measure the sustainability of biomass-based carbon-chemicals and renewable energy. The production of ethylene, propylene, toluene, xylenes, styrene, and ethylene oxides cannot be sustainable due to the limited amount of bioethanol. The required volume of corn and the corresponding size of land are only enough to replace one sixth of fossil resources in the USA, EU, and China, and practically insufficient in Canada and the Russian Federation. Until the utilization of electricity becomes practical and economical in aviation, biomass-based liquid fuels are the sustainable alternative.",
author = "I. Horv{\'a}th and Edit Cs{\'e}falvay",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1039/9781788016131-00001",
language = "English",
series = "RSC Green Chemistry",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "61",
pages = "1--19",
editor = "Roberto Ballini",
booktitle = "Rubber Recycling",
edition = "61",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - CHAPTER 1

T2 - Sustainability of Green Synthetic Processes and Procedures

AU - Horváth, I.

AU - Cséfalvay, Edit

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Although the ecological footprint was perhaps the first green metric, the atom economy and E-factor have become the key metrics of green chemistry by providing the mass balance of chemical reactions and processes at the molecular level. Sustainability was poorly defined originally, since the key requisite to accurately forecast the needs of future generations remains difficult to pinpoint. Consequently, sustainability was replaced with suitability by many stake holders, as they had vested and/or conflicts of interests to label suitable developments sustainable. The sustainable development goals recently introduced by the United Nations seem to serve as a 'roadmap to happiness' instead of metrics. A simple and independent definition of sustainability was recently provided: Nature's resources, including energy, should be used at a rate at which they can be replaced naturally, and the generation of wastes cannot be faster than the rate of their remediation by Nature. The ethanol equivalent, the sustainability values of resource replacement and fate of waste, and the sustainability indicator have been recently defined to measure the sustainability of biomass-based carbon-chemicals and renewable energy. The production of ethylene, propylene, toluene, xylenes, styrene, and ethylene oxides cannot be sustainable due to the limited amount of bioethanol. The required volume of corn and the corresponding size of land are only enough to replace one sixth of fossil resources in the USA, EU, and China, and practically insufficient in Canada and the Russian Federation. Until the utilization of electricity becomes practical and economical in aviation, biomass-based liquid fuels are the sustainable alternative.

AB - Although the ecological footprint was perhaps the first green metric, the atom economy and E-factor have become the key metrics of green chemistry by providing the mass balance of chemical reactions and processes at the molecular level. Sustainability was poorly defined originally, since the key requisite to accurately forecast the needs of future generations remains difficult to pinpoint. Consequently, sustainability was replaced with suitability by many stake holders, as they had vested and/or conflicts of interests to label suitable developments sustainable. The sustainable development goals recently introduced by the United Nations seem to serve as a 'roadmap to happiness' instead of metrics. A simple and independent definition of sustainability was recently provided: Nature's resources, including energy, should be used at a rate at which they can be replaced naturally, and the generation of wastes cannot be faster than the rate of their remediation by Nature. The ethanol equivalent, the sustainability values of resource replacement and fate of waste, and the sustainability indicator have been recently defined to measure the sustainability of biomass-based carbon-chemicals and renewable energy. The production of ethylene, propylene, toluene, xylenes, styrene, and ethylene oxides cannot be sustainable due to the limited amount of bioethanol. The required volume of corn and the corresponding size of land are only enough to replace one sixth of fossil resources in the USA, EU, and China, and practically insufficient in Canada and the Russian Federation. Until the utilization of electricity becomes practical and economical in aviation, biomass-based liquid fuels are the sustainable alternative.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068722730&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068722730&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/9781788016131-00001

DO - 10.1039/9781788016131-00001

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85068722730

T3 - RSC Green Chemistry

SP - 1

EP - 19

BT - Rubber Recycling

A2 - Ballini, Roberto

PB - Royal Society of Chemistry

ER -