Changes in Tumor Characteristics in Kidney Transplanted Patients over the Last 40 Years

G. Végso, A. Tóth, Toronyi, F. Perner, Z. Máthé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Post-transplantation tumors (PTTs) are the greatest limiting factor for patient survival following organ transplantation. Aim To describe the incidence and main characteristics of malignancies developed in patients who underwent kidney transplantation in Budapest between 1973 and 2014. Methods During this period, the essential data for PTTs were repeatedly evaluated. In this study, the results from 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, and 2013 were evaluated. Results Incidence of PTTs increased from 2.3% to 11.1%. Male/female ratio was 2:1. Skin, native kidney, and lung cancers were the most common tumors during the entire observation period. Lymphoma was seen rarely at the beginning and became common in 2013. The same was observed in the most frequent general population tumors (colorectal, breast, hepatic, prostate, gastric cancer, and malignant melanoma) where the occurrence increased in the last 10 years. Mean age of patients increased from 35.7 to 56.5 years. During the last 20 years, age of recipients increased: above 50 years from 22.9% to 40.5%, and above 60 years from 8.2% to 23.1%. Patient survival was different according to tumor stage at discovering, i.e. renal cell carcinoma was usually discovered in stage I. resulting in a 66.1% 5-year survival rate, whereas 43.5% of colorectal cancers were diagnosed in stage IV, with a 13.9% 5-year survival rate. Conclusion The frequency of PTTs and proportion of elderly persons undergoing transplants are continuously increasing. Tumor stage is a determining factor for patient survival. Recognition of precancerous conditions, diagnosis of tumors in early stage, and oncological screening can improve survival time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2198-2200
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Kidney
Neoplasms
Transplantation
Survival
Colorectal Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Precancerous Conditions
Kidney Neoplasms
Incidence
Organ Transplantation
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Kidney Transplantation
Stomach Neoplasms
Melanoma
Lymphoma
Lung Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Observation
Breast Neoplasms
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Changes in Tumor Characteristics in Kidney Transplanted Patients over the Last 40 Years. / Végso, G.; Tóth, A.; Toronyi, ; Perner, F.; Máthé, Z.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 47, No. 7, 01.09.2015, p. 2198-2200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Végso, G. ; Tóth, A. ; Toronyi, ; Perner, F. ; Máthé, Z. / Changes in Tumor Characteristics in Kidney Transplanted Patients over the Last 40 Years. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2015 ; Vol. 47, No. 7. pp. 2198-2200.
@article{3d11a241c52542e88701c6a15de02c29,
title = "Changes in Tumor Characteristics in Kidney Transplanted Patients over the Last 40 Years",
abstract = "Background Post-transplantation tumors (PTTs) are the greatest limiting factor for patient survival following organ transplantation. Aim To describe the incidence and main characteristics of malignancies developed in patients who underwent kidney transplantation in Budapest between 1973 and 2014. Methods During this period, the essential data for PTTs were repeatedly evaluated. In this study, the results from 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, and 2013 were evaluated. Results Incidence of PTTs increased from 2.3{\%} to 11.1{\%}. Male/female ratio was 2:1. Skin, native kidney, and lung cancers were the most common tumors during the entire observation period. Lymphoma was seen rarely at the beginning and became common in 2013. The same was observed in the most frequent general population tumors (colorectal, breast, hepatic, prostate, gastric cancer, and malignant melanoma) where the occurrence increased in the last 10 years. Mean age of patients increased from 35.7 to 56.5 years. During the last 20 years, age of recipients increased: above 50 years from 22.9{\%} to 40.5{\%}, and above 60 years from 8.2{\%} to 23.1{\%}. Patient survival was different according to tumor stage at discovering, i.e. renal cell carcinoma was usually discovered in stage I. resulting in a 66.1{\%} 5-year survival rate, whereas 43.5{\%} of colorectal cancers were diagnosed in stage IV, with a 13.9{\%} 5-year survival rate. Conclusion The frequency of PTTs and proportion of elderly persons undergoing transplants are continuously increasing. Tumor stage is a determining factor for patient survival. Recognition of precancerous conditions, diagnosis of tumors in early stage, and oncological screening can improve survival time.",
author = "G. V{\'e}gso and A. T{\'o}th and Toronyi and F. Perner and Z. M{\'a}th{\'e}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.transproceed.2015.07.021",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "2198--2200",
journal = "Transplantation Proceedings",
issn = "0041-1345",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in Tumor Characteristics in Kidney Transplanted Patients over the Last 40 Years

AU - Végso, G.

AU - Tóth, A.

AU - Toronyi,

AU - Perner, F.

AU - Máthé, Z.

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Background Post-transplantation tumors (PTTs) are the greatest limiting factor for patient survival following organ transplantation. Aim To describe the incidence and main characteristics of malignancies developed in patients who underwent kidney transplantation in Budapest between 1973 and 2014. Methods During this period, the essential data for PTTs were repeatedly evaluated. In this study, the results from 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, and 2013 were evaluated. Results Incidence of PTTs increased from 2.3% to 11.1%. Male/female ratio was 2:1. Skin, native kidney, and lung cancers were the most common tumors during the entire observation period. Lymphoma was seen rarely at the beginning and became common in 2013. The same was observed in the most frequent general population tumors (colorectal, breast, hepatic, prostate, gastric cancer, and malignant melanoma) where the occurrence increased in the last 10 years. Mean age of patients increased from 35.7 to 56.5 years. During the last 20 years, age of recipients increased: above 50 years from 22.9% to 40.5%, and above 60 years from 8.2% to 23.1%. Patient survival was different according to tumor stage at discovering, i.e. renal cell carcinoma was usually discovered in stage I. resulting in a 66.1% 5-year survival rate, whereas 43.5% of colorectal cancers were diagnosed in stage IV, with a 13.9% 5-year survival rate. Conclusion The frequency of PTTs and proportion of elderly persons undergoing transplants are continuously increasing. Tumor stage is a determining factor for patient survival. Recognition of precancerous conditions, diagnosis of tumors in early stage, and oncological screening can improve survival time.

AB - Background Post-transplantation tumors (PTTs) are the greatest limiting factor for patient survival following organ transplantation. Aim To describe the incidence and main characteristics of malignancies developed in patients who underwent kidney transplantation in Budapest between 1973 and 2014. Methods During this period, the essential data for PTTs were repeatedly evaluated. In this study, the results from 1990, 1995, 2000, 2006, and 2013 were evaluated. Results Incidence of PTTs increased from 2.3% to 11.1%. Male/female ratio was 2:1. Skin, native kidney, and lung cancers were the most common tumors during the entire observation period. Lymphoma was seen rarely at the beginning and became common in 2013. The same was observed in the most frequent general population tumors (colorectal, breast, hepatic, prostate, gastric cancer, and malignant melanoma) where the occurrence increased in the last 10 years. Mean age of patients increased from 35.7 to 56.5 years. During the last 20 years, age of recipients increased: above 50 years from 22.9% to 40.5%, and above 60 years from 8.2% to 23.1%. Patient survival was different according to tumor stage at discovering, i.e. renal cell carcinoma was usually discovered in stage I. resulting in a 66.1% 5-year survival rate, whereas 43.5% of colorectal cancers were diagnosed in stage IV, with a 13.9% 5-year survival rate. Conclusion The frequency of PTTs and proportion of elderly persons undergoing transplants are continuously increasing. Tumor stage is a determining factor for patient survival. Recognition of precancerous conditions, diagnosis of tumors in early stage, and oncological screening can improve survival time.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941011860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941011860&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2015.07.021

DO - 10.1016/j.transproceed.2015.07.021

M3 - Article

C2 - 26361679

AN - SCOPUS:84941011860

VL - 47

SP - 2198

EP - 2200

JO - Transplantation Proceedings

JF - Transplantation Proceedings

SN - 0041-1345

IS - 7

ER -