Changes in the meiotic pairing behaviour of a winter wheat-winter barley hybrid maintained for a long term in tissue culture, and tracing the barley chromatin in the progeny using GISH and SSR markers

M. Molnár-Láng, C. Novotny, G. Linc, E. D. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to produce backcross progenies in a new winter wheat ('Asakaze komugi') x winter barley ('Manas') hybrid produced in Martonvásár. As no backcross seeds were obtained from the initial hybrids, young inflorescences of the hybrids were used for in vitro multiplication in three consecutive cycles until a backcross progeny was developed. The chromosome constitution of the regenerated hybrids was analysed using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) after each in vitro multiplication cycle. The seven barley chromosomes were present even after the third in vitro multiplication cycle but abnormalities were observed. Sixteen BC2 plants containing, according to GISH analysis, one to three complete barley chromosomes, two deletion barley chromosomes and a dicentric wheat-barley translocation were grown to maturity from the single backcross progeny. The barley chromatin was identified using 20 chromosome-specific barley SSR markers. All seven barley chromosomes were represented in the BC2 plants. A deletion breakpoint at FL ±0.3 on the 5HL chromosome arm facilitated the physical localization of microsatellite markers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-252
Number of pages6
JournalPlant Breeding
Volume124
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2005

Keywords

  • Genomic in situ hybridization
  • Hordeum vulgare
  • Meiotic behaviour
  • Physical mapping
  • SSR markers
  • Triticum aestivum
  • Wheat-barley hybrids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

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