Changes in exhaled carbon monoxide and nitric oxide levels following allergen challenge in patients with asthma

P. Paredi, M. J. Leckie, I. Horváth, L. Allegra, S. A. Kharitonov, P. J. Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbon monoxide is a product of haem degradation by haem oxygenase (HO), activated by inflammatory cytokines and oxidants. This study examined whether allergen challenge can increase exhaled CO levels, as a reflection of HO activation. Exhaled CO and nitric oxide, an expired gas also thought to reflect cytokine-induced airway inflammation, were measured in 15 atopic steroid-naive nonsmoking patients with asthma (13 males, aged 30±2 yrs) before and for up to 20 h after allergen challenge. Baseline CO (4.4±0.3 parts per million (ppm)) and NO (20.6±1.2 parts per billion (ppb)) levels were elevated in asthmatic as compared with nonsmoking normal volunteers (n=37, 2.1±0.2 ppm and 7.0±0.1 ppb, respectively, p1) there was a maximal increase in exhaled CO at 1 h (34.3±7.1%) and at 6 h (69±12%, p1 (28±9%, p1 (9±3%, p>0.05) at 9 h, whereas exhaled NO was not significantly changed. In five patients exhaled CO was not attenuated by inhalation of increasing concentrations of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) or its subsequent relief by β2-agonists. In conclusion, exhaled carbon monoxide is increased during the early and late asthmatic reactions independently of the change in airway calibre, while exhaled nitric oxide is increased only during the late reaction and follows the increase in carbon monoxide and fall in the forced expiratory volume in one second in time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-52
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Carbon Monoxide
Allergens
Nitric Oxide
Asthma
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)
Cytokines
Forced Expiratory Volume
Heme
Oxidants
Histamine
Inhalation
Healthy Volunteers
Gases
Steroids
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Allergen challenge
  • Asthma
  • Carbon monoxide
  • Inflammation
  • Nitric oxide
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Changes in exhaled carbon monoxide and nitric oxide levels following allergen challenge in patients with asthma. / Paredi, P.; Leckie, M. J.; Horváth, I.; Allegra, L.; Kharitonov, S. A.; Barnes, P. J.

In: European Respiratory Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 1999, p. 48-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paredi, P. ; Leckie, M. J. ; Horváth, I. ; Allegra, L. ; Kharitonov, S. A. ; Barnes, P. J. / Changes in exhaled carbon monoxide and nitric oxide levels following allergen challenge in patients with asthma. In: European Respiratory Journal. 1999 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 48-52.
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