Changes in brain activation caused by caloric stimulation in the case of cochleovestibular denervation - PET study

M. Kisely, M. Emri, Z. Lengyel, B. Kálvin, G. Horváth, L. Trón, L. Mikó, I. Sziklai, A. Tóth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are a number of well-known stimulation methods for the investigation of the central projection of the vestibular system. In addition to optokinetic, galvanic and neck vibration tests, the most widespread method is caloric stimulation. These listed methods cause not only vestibular, but also other effects on the central nervous system (CNS) (acoustic, tactile and nociceptive). In this paper, positron emission tomography (PET) was used to investigate whether caloric stimulation contains a non-vestibular (extravestibular) component, which would cause a distortion in the cortical activity and therefore in the vestibular effect on the CNS. Caloric stimulation was carried out in six patients who had been operated on due to cerebello-pontine angle tumour. These patients suffered post-operatively from a complete lesion of the vestibular system and anacusis on the operated side. Ipsilaterally activated areas were the inferior pole of the post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction, caudal part of the post-central gyrus (SI, SII), inferior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus. Contralaterally activated areas were the anterior cingulate gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, posterior part of the insula, post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction (SII). Ipsilaterally deactivated areas were the caudal and cranial part of the medial occipital gyrus (V2, V3, V4, V5). Contralaterally deactivated areas were the lingual gyrus, inferior occipital gyrus (V2, V3) and fusiform gyrus. On the basis of these data, it was postulated that, during caloric stimulation, extravestibular reaction also occurs, which corresponds to the subjective feeling of heat and pain. The deactivation of the occipital cortex due to an extravestibular effect was demonstrated. This is the first observation to suggest the possibility of nociceptivevisual interaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)967-973
Number of pages7
JournalNuclear Medicine Communications
Volume23
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2002

Fingerprint

Occipital Lobe
Denervation
Positron-Emission Tomography
Somatosensory Cortex
Brain
Prefrontal Cortex
Central Nervous System
Brain Stem Neoplasms
Parietal Lobe
Acoustic Neuroma
Gyrus Cinguli
Touch
Temporal Lobe
Vibration
Acoustics
Emotions
Neck
Hot Temperature
Observation
Pain

Keywords

  • Brain activation
  • Caloric stimulation
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Vestibular cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Changes in brain activation caused by caloric stimulation in the case of cochleovestibular denervation - PET study. / Kisely, M.; Emri, M.; Lengyel, Z.; Kálvin, B.; Horváth, G.; Trón, L.; Mikó, L.; Sziklai, I.; Tóth, A.

In: Nuclear Medicine Communications, Vol. 23, No. 10, 10.2002, p. 967-973.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6a9f08b630d548bdb291674545702bdc,
title = "Changes in brain activation caused by caloric stimulation in the case of cochleovestibular denervation - PET study",
abstract = "There are a number of well-known stimulation methods for the investigation of the central projection of the vestibular system. In addition to optokinetic, galvanic and neck vibration tests, the most widespread method is caloric stimulation. These listed methods cause not only vestibular, but also other effects on the central nervous system (CNS) (acoustic, tactile and nociceptive). In this paper, positron emission tomography (PET) was used to investigate whether caloric stimulation contains a non-vestibular (extravestibular) component, which would cause a distortion in the cortical activity and therefore in the vestibular effect on the CNS. Caloric stimulation was carried out in six patients who had been operated on due to cerebello-pontine angle tumour. These patients suffered post-operatively from a complete lesion of the vestibular system and anacusis on the operated side. Ipsilaterally activated areas were the inferior pole of the post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction, caudal part of the post-central gyrus (SI, SII), inferior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus. Contralaterally activated areas were the anterior cingulate gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, posterior part of the insula, post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction (SII). Ipsilaterally deactivated areas were the caudal and cranial part of the medial occipital gyrus (V2, V3, V4, V5). Contralaterally deactivated areas were the lingual gyrus, inferior occipital gyrus (V2, V3) and fusiform gyrus. On the basis of these data, it was postulated that, during caloric stimulation, extravestibular reaction also occurs, which corresponds to the subjective feeling of heat and pain. The deactivation of the occipital cortex due to an extravestibular effect was demonstrated. This is the first observation to suggest the possibility of nociceptivevisual interaction.",
keywords = "Brain activation, Caloric stimulation, Positron emission tomography, Vestibular cortex",
author = "M. Kisely and M. Emri and Z. Lengyel and B. K{\'a}lvin and G. Horv{\'a}th and L. Tr{\'o}n and L. Mik{\'o} and I. Sziklai and A. T{\'o}th",
year = "2002",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1097/00006231-200210000-00006",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "967--973",
journal = "Nuclear Medicine Communications",
issn = "0143-3636",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in brain activation caused by caloric stimulation in the case of cochleovestibular denervation - PET study

AU - Kisely, M.

AU - Emri, M.

AU - Lengyel, Z.

AU - Kálvin, B.

AU - Horváth, G.

AU - Trón, L.

AU - Mikó, L.

AU - Sziklai, I.

AU - Tóth, A.

PY - 2002/10

Y1 - 2002/10

N2 - There are a number of well-known stimulation methods for the investigation of the central projection of the vestibular system. In addition to optokinetic, galvanic and neck vibration tests, the most widespread method is caloric stimulation. These listed methods cause not only vestibular, but also other effects on the central nervous system (CNS) (acoustic, tactile and nociceptive). In this paper, positron emission tomography (PET) was used to investigate whether caloric stimulation contains a non-vestibular (extravestibular) component, which would cause a distortion in the cortical activity and therefore in the vestibular effect on the CNS. Caloric stimulation was carried out in six patients who had been operated on due to cerebello-pontine angle tumour. These patients suffered post-operatively from a complete lesion of the vestibular system and anacusis on the operated side. Ipsilaterally activated areas were the inferior pole of the post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction, caudal part of the post-central gyrus (SI, SII), inferior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus. Contralaterally activated areas were the anterior cingulate gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, posterior part of the insula, post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction (SII). Ipsilaterally deactivated areas were the caudal and cranial part of the medial occipital gyrus (V2, V3, V4, V5). Contralaterally deactivated areas were the lingual gyrus, inferior occipital gyrus (V2, V3) and fusiform gyrus. On the basis of these data, it was postulated that, during caloric stimulation, extravestibular reaction also occurs, which corresponds to the subjective feeling of heat and pain. The deactivation of the occipital cortex due to an extravestibular effect was demonstrated. This is the first observation to suggest the possibility of nociceptivevisual interaction.

AB - There are a number of well-known stimulation methods for the investigation of the central projection of the vestibular system. In addition to optokinetic, galvanic and neck vibration tests, the most widespread method is caloric stimulation. These listed methods cause not only vestibular, but also other effects on the central nervous system (CNS) (acoustic, tactile and nociceptive). In this paper, positron emission tomography (PET) was used to investigate whether caloric stimulation contains a non-vestibular (extravestibular) component, which would cause a distortion in the cortical activity and therefore in the vestibular effect on the CNS. Caloric stimulation was carried out in six patients who had been operated on due to cerebello-pontine angle tumour. These patients suffered post-operatively from a complete lesion of the vestibular system and anacusis on the operated side. Ipsilaterally activated areas were the inferior pole of the post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction, caudal part of the post-central gyrus (SI, SII), inferior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus. Contralaterally activated areas were the anterior cingulate gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, posterior part of the insula, post-central gyrus and temporoparietal junction (SII). Ipsilaterally deactivated areas were the caudal and cranial part of the medial occipital gyrus (V2, V3, V4, V5). Contralaterally deactivated areas were the lingual gyrus, inferior occipital gyrus (V2, V3) and fusiform gyrus. On the basis of these data, it was postulated that, during caloric stimulation, extravestibular reaction also occurs, which corresponds to the subjective feeling of heat and pain. The deactivation of the occipital cortex due to an extravestibular effect was demonstrated. This is the first observation to suggest the possibility of nociceptivevisual interaction.

KW - Brain activation

KW - Caloric stimulation

KW - Positron emission tomography

KW - Vestibular cortex

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036793511&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036793511&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00006231-200210000-00006

DO - 10.1097/00006231-200210000-00006

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 967

EP - 973

JO - Nuclear Medicine Communications

JF - Nuclear Medicine Communications

SN - 0143-3636

IS - 10

ER -