Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes: The whitehall II study

Jane E. Ferrie, Mika Kivimaki, Tasnime N. Akbaraly, A. Tabák, Jessica Abell, George Davey Smith, Marianna Virtanen, Meena Kumari, Martin J. Shipley

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Evidence suggests that short and long sleep durations are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Using successive data waves spanning >20 years, we examined whether a change in sleep duration is associatedwith incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sleep duration was reported at the beginning and end of four 5-year cycles: 1985- 1988 to 1991-1994 (n = 5,613), 1991-1994 to 1997-1999 (n = 4,193), 1997-1999 to 2002-2004 (n = 3,840), and 2002-2004 to 2007-2009 (n = 4,195). At each cycle, change in sleep duration was calculated for participants without diabetes. Incident diabetes at the end of the subsequent 5-year period was defined using 1) fasting glucose, 2) 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and 3) glycated hemoglobin, in conjunction with diabetes medication and self-reported doctor diagnosis. RESULTS Compared with the reference group of persistent 7-h sleepers, an increase of ‡2 h sleep per night was associated with a higher risk of incident diabetes (odds ratio 1.65 [95% CI 1.15, 2.37]) in analyses adjusted for age, sex, employment grade, and ethnic group. This association was partially attenuated by adjustment for BMI and change inweight (1.50 [1.04, 2.16]). An increased risk of incident diabetes was also seen in persistent short sleepers (average ≤5.5 h/night; 1.35 [1.04, 1.76]), but this evidence weakened on adjustment for BMI and change in weight (1.25 [0.96, 1.63]). CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that individuals whose sleep duration increases are at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1467-1472
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2015

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Sleep
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Glucose Tolerance Test
Ethnic Groups
Fasting
Odds Ratio
Weights and Measures
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

Ferrie, J. E., Kivimaki, M., Akbaraly, T. N., Tabák, A., Abell, J., Smith, G. D., ... Shipley, M. J. (2015). Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes: The whitehall II study. Diabetes Care, 38(8), 1467-1472. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc15-0186

Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes : The whitehall II study. / Ferrie, Jane E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Akbaraly, Tasnime N.; Tabák, A.; Abell, Jessica; Smith, George Davey; Virtanen, Marianna; Kumari, Meena; Shipley, Martin J.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.08.2015, p. 1467-1472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferrie, JE, Kivimaki, M, Akbaraly, TN, Tabák, A, Abell, J, Smith, GD, Virtanen, M, Kumari, M & Shipley, MJ 2015, 'Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes: The whitehall II study', Diabetes Care, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 1467-1472. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc15-0186
Ferrie JE, Kivimaki M, Akbaraly TN, Tabák A, Abell J, Smith GD et al. Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes: The whitehall II study. Diabetes Care. 2015 Aug 1;38(8):1467-1472. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc15-0186
Ferrie, Jane E. ; Kivimaki, Mika ; Akbaraly, Tasnime N. ; Tabák, A. ; Abell, Jessica ; Smith, George Davey ; Virtanen, Marianna ; Kumari, Meena ; Shipley, Martin J. / Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes : The whitehall II study. In: Diabetes Care. 2015 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 1467-1472.
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