Change in plasma prolactin and clinical response to haloperidol in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

James C Y Chou, Richard Douyon, P. Czobor, Jan Volavka, Thomas B. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There has been a long-standing interest in plasma prolactin as a potential in vivo indicator of blockade of tuberoinfundibular D2 dopamine receptors. Potential relationships between prolactin response and neuroleptic treatment have been obscured by the use of high doses which have caused prolactin to plateau. With lower doses of neuroleptic now commonly in use, prolactin may be more valuable as a correlate of clinical response. In this study, 23 acutely exacerbated schizophrenic and schizoaffective patients were washed out for at least 6 days and were then treated with haloperidol to achieve fixed low to moderate plasma levels under double-blind conditions. Clinical response, plasma prolactin, and haloperidol plasma levels were measured weekly for 3 weeks. Clinical symptoms at endpoint were related to both prolactin change and final prolactin level during haloperidol treatment. Specifically, fewer symptoms at endpoint were associated with a greater increase in prolactin over time and a higher prolactin level at endpoint. Thus, prolactin increase caused by low to moderate doses of haloperidol may be a correlate of endpoint symptomatology. As lower doses of typical neuroleptics are now in use, pirolactin response as a predictor of clinical response may have more clinical utility. Further study of prolactin and clinical response to typical neuroleptics should focus on low neuroleptic doses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 19 1998

Fingerprint

Haloperidol
Prolactin
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia
Antipsychotic Agents
Dopamine D2 Receptors

Keywords

  • Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
  • Dopamine
  • Haloperidol
  • Outcome
  • Positive symptoms
  • Prolactin
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Change in plasma prolactin and clinical response to haloperidol in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. / Chou, James C Y; Douyon, Richard; Czobor, P.; Volavka, Jan; Cooper, Thomas B.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 81, No. 1, 19.10.1998, p. 51-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chou, James C Y ; Douyon, Richard ; Czobor, P. ; Volavka, Jan ; Cooper, Thomas B. / Change in plasma prolactin and clinical response to haloperidol in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. In: Psychiatry Research. 1998 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 51-55.
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