Cerebrospinal fluid passage of intravenous magnesium sulfate in neurosurgical patients

T. Fuchs-Buder, M. R. Tramèr, E. Tassonyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests a neuroprotective potential of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4). Only limited information about the passage of MgSO4 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is available in neurosurgical patients. However, with regard to the clinical relevance of magnesium's neuroprotective properties, quantitative data about its CSF passage are needed. The present study alms to assess the amount and the time course of magnesium's CSF passage in neurosurgical patients. To this end, 20 patients undergoing general anesthesia for neurosurgery and needing CSF drainage were included. Patients received an i.v. bolus of 60 mg/kg MgSO4. The increase in plasma and CSF magnesium concentration were measured 30, 90, and 240 min after the end of the MgSO4 infusion. These values were compared with the baseline levels taken before the start of the MgSO4 infusion. Thus, each patient served as his or her own control. Values are expressed as means ± SD. The plasma magnesium levels were measured as follows: baseline, 0.74 ± 0.12 mM; at 30 min, 1.24 ± 0.1 mM (p < 0.01); at 90 min, 0.95 ± 0.15 mM (p < 0.01), and at 240 min, 0.82 ± 0.14 mM (p < 0.05). The CSF magnesium levels were measured as follows: baseline, 0.95 ± 0.11 mM; at 30 min, 1.00 ± 0.15 mM (NS); at 90 min, 1.10 ± 0.17 mM (p < 0.01); and at 240 min, 1.13 ± 0.19 mM (p < 0.001). We concluded that a bolus of 60 mg/kg of MgSO4 leads at least after 90 min to a significant increase in the CSF magnesium concentration. Moreover, the increase in plasma and CSF magnesium concentration is not parallel. Thus, plasma magnesium concentration cannot be used to predict the changes in CSF concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-328
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1997

Keywords

  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Magnesium sulfate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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