A C-vitamin celluláris, intracelluláris transzportja. Fiziológiai vonatkozások

Translated title of the contribution: Cellular and intracellular transport of vitamin C. The physiologic aspects

A. Szarka, Tamás Lorincz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin C requirement is satisfied by natural sources and vitamin C supplements in the ordinary human diet. The two major forms of vitamin C in the diet are L-ascorbic acid and L-dehydroascorbic acid. Both ascorbate and dehydroascorbate are absorbed along the entire length of the human intestine. The reduced form, L-ascorbic acid is imported by an active mechanism, requiring two sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (SVCT1 and SVCT2). The transport of the oxidized form, dehydroascorbate is mediated by glucose transporters GLUT1, GLUT3 and possibly GLUT4. Initial rate of uptake of both ascorbate and dehydroascorbate is saturable with increasing external substrate concentration. Vitamin C plasma concentrations are tightly controlled when the vitamin is taken orally. It has two simple reasons, on the one hand, the capacity of the transporters is limited, on the other hand the two Na+-dependent transporters can be down-regulated by an elevated level of ascorbate.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1651-1656
Number of pages6
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume154
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2013

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Ascorbic Acid
Sodium-Coupled Vitamin C Transporters
Dehydroascorbic Acid
Diet
Facilitative Glucose Transport Proteins
Vitamins
Intestines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A C-vitamin celluláris, intracelluláris transzportja. Fiziológiai vonatkozások. / Szarka, A.; Lorincz, Tamás.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 154, No. 42, 01.10.2013, p. 1651-1656.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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