Cell death in HIV pathogenesis and its modulation by retinoids

Z. Szondy, R. Tóth, É V A Szegezdi, U. W E Reichert, Philippe Ancian, L. Fésüs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus exhibit a progressive decline in the CD4 T-cell number, resulting in immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignancies. Although CD4 T cell production is impaired in patients infected with HIV, there is now increasing evidence that the primary basis of T cell depletion is accelerated apoptosis of CD4 and CD8 T cells. The rate of lymphocyte apoptosis in HIV infection correlates inversely with the progression of the disease: it is low in long-term progressors and in patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy. Interestingly, only a minor fraction of apoptotic lymphocytes are infected by HIV, indicating that the enhanced apoptosis does not necessarily always serve to remove the HIV+ cells and results from mechanisms other than direct infection. Thus, understanding and influencing the mechanisms of HIV-associated lymphocyte apoptosis may lead to new therapies for HIV disease. In this paper the potential effects of retinoids on CD4 T cell apoptosis is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-107
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume946
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

T-cells
Retinoids
Cell death
Cell Death
Modulation
HIV
Lymphocytes
Apoptosis
T-Lymphocytes
Viruses
Opportunistic Infections
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
HIV Infections
Disease Progression
AIDS/HIV
Cells
Cell Count
Infection
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • CD4 T cells
  • CD95 ligand
  • HIV
  • Nur77
  • Retinoic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Cell death in HIV pathogenesis and its modulation by retinoids. / Szondy, Z.; Tóth, R.; Szegezdi, É V A; Reichert, U. W E; Ancian, Philippe; Fésüs, L.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 946, 2001, p. 95-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szondy, Z. ; Tóth, R. ; Szegezdi, É V A ; Reichert, U. W E ; Ancian, Philippe ; Fésüs, L. / Cell death in HIV pathogenesis and its modulation by retinoids. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2001 ; Vol. 946. pp. 95-107.
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