Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer

Christine Desmedt, Lucy Yates, J. Kulka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of “driver” mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a “metastatic cascade” model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalCancer metastasis reviews
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Mar 8 2016

Fingerprint

Medical Genetics
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Genome
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Mutation
Molecular Evolution
Heterografts
Base Pairing
Disease Progression
Decision Making
Therapeutics
Neoplasm Metastasis
DNA

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Genomics
  • Progression
  • Sequencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers : breast cancer. / Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, J.

In: Cancer metastasis reviews, 08.03.2016, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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