Cardioprotection with white wine

J. Cui, A. Tósaki, A. A E Bertelli, A. Bertelli, N. Maulik, D. K. Das

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cardioprotective effects of red wine have been attributed to several polyphenolic antioxidants including resveratrol and proanthocyanidins. The goal of the present study was to determine whether white wines could also provide cardioprotection. Three different white wines (white wine #1, #2 and #3) were chosen for this study. Ethanol-free extracts of the wines were prepared by vacuum evaporation. Rats weighing approximately 200 g were given either 50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg of each wine extract for 3 weeks. The rats were anesthetized and sacrificed and their hearts were excised for the preparation of isolated working rat heart. All hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Cardiac function including heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), maximum first derivative of developed pressure (LVdp/dtmax), left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEP), aortic flow (AF) and coronary flow (CF) were continuously monitored and myocardial infarct size was measured at the end of the experiments. The results of our study demonstrated that among the three different white wines, only white wine #2 conferred cardioprotection as evidenced by improved postischemic ventricular recovery compared with controls. The same white wine at a dose of 50 mg/kg also showed improvement in postischemic contractile recovery but the differences compared with controls were not significant. The amount of malondialdehyde production from these hearts was lower than that found in control hearts, indicating reduced formation of reactive oxygen species in white wine #2-treated rats. In vitro studies using a chemiluminescence technique revealed that white wine #2 scavenged both superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. The results of our study demonstrate that white wine #2 provided cardioprotection and the cardioprotective effect of the wine can be attributed, at least in part, to its ability to function as an in vivo antioxidant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalDrugs under Experimental and Clinical Research
Volume28
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Wine
Ventricular Pressure
Superoxides
Antioxidants
Blood Pressure
Proanthocyanidins
Vacuum
Luminescence
Malondialdehyde
Hydroxyl Radical
Reperfusion
Reactive Oxygen Species
Ethanol
Ischemia
Heart Rate
Myocardial Infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Drug Discovery
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Cui, J., Tósaki, A., Bertelli, A. A. E., Bertelli, A., Maulik, N., & Das, D. K. (2002). Cardioprotection with white wine. Drugs under Experimental and Clinical Research, 28(1), 1-10.

Cardioprotection with white wine. / Cui, J.; Tósaki, A.; Bertelli, A. A E; Bertelli, A.; Maulik, N.; Das, D. K.

In: Drugs under Experimental and Clinical Research, Vol. 28, No. 1, 2002, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cui, J, Tósaki, A, Bertelli, AAE, Bertelli, A, Maulik, N & Das, DK 2002, 'Cardioprotection with white wine', Drugs under Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 1-10.
Cui J, Tósaki A, Bertelli AAE, Bertelli A, Maulik N, Das DK. Cardioprotection with white wine. Drugs under Experimental and Clinical Research. 2002;28(1):1-10.
Cui, J. ; Tósaki, A. ; Bertelli, A. A E ; Bertelli, A. ; Maulik, N. ; Das, D. K. / Cardioprotection with white wine. In: Drugs under Experimental and Clinical Research. 2002 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 1-10.
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