Carcinoid tumorok

Translated title of the contribution: Carcinoid tumors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carcinoid tumors are rare neoplasms: they are traditionally divided into three subgroups (foregut, midgut and hindgut tumors). Despite their neuroendocrine cell origin and the similarities in their histological structure, the molecular background, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, as well as the prognosis of carcinoid tumors located at different sites may be highly variable. Although sensitive biochemical markers (serum chromogranin A concentration, urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid excretion) and localization methods (somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, positron emission tomography) are available, a considerable number of patients are only diagnosed at the late stages of the disease. When surgical cure is not obtainable such as in cases with advanced metastatic disease, surgical procedures to reduce tumoral tissue should be still considered. At present, the most effective drugs for the symptomatic treatment of carcinoid tumors are somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide). In addition to their beneficial effect on clinical symptoms they may stabilize tumor growth for many years and rarely, tumor regression is produced. Radioisotope-labelled somatostatin analogues are presently under clinical evaluation, which may offer new therapeutic means for patients with carcinoid tumors. carcinoid tumors, foregut carcinoid, midgut carcinoid, hindgut carcinoid, chromogranin A, 5-hidroxyindoleacetic acid, somatostatin analogues, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)11-20
Number of pages10
JournalLege Artis Medicinae
Volume15
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Carcinoid Tumor
Somatostatin
Chromogranin A
Somatostatin Receptors
Radionuclide Imaging
Neoplasms
Neuroendocrine Cells
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Octreotide
Molecular Structure
Radioisotopes
Positron-Emission Tomography
Therapeutics
Biomarkers
Acids
Growth
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Carcinoid tumorok. / Rácz, K.

In: Lege Artis Medicinae, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2005, p. 11-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rácz, K 2005, 'Carcinoid tumorok', Lege Artis Medicinae, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 11-20.
Rácz, K. / Carcinoid tumorok. In: Lege Artis Medicinae. 2005 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 11-20.
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