Can the stress protein response be controlled by 'membrane-lipid therapy'?

L. Vígh, I. Horváth, Bruno Maresca, John L. Harwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In addition to high temperature, other stresses and clinical conditions such as cancer and diabetes can lead to the alteration of heat-shock protein (HSP) levels in cells. Moreover, HSPs can associate with either specific lipids or with areas of special membrane topology (such as lipid rafts), and changes in the physical state of cellular membranes can alter hsp gene expression. We propose that membrane microheterogeneity is important for regulating the HSP response. In support of this hypothesis, when particular membrane intercalating compounds are used to alter membrane properties, the simultaneous normalization of dysregulated expression of HSPs causes beneficial responses to disease states. Therefore, these compounds (such as hydroxylamine derivatives) have the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in 'membrane-lipid therapy'.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-363
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Biochemical Sciences
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2007

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Membrane Lipids
Heat-Shock Proteins
Membranes
Lipids
Therapeutics
Heat-Shock Response
Hydroxylamine
Medical problems
Gene expression
Topology
Derivatives
Gene Expression
Temperature
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Can the stress protein response be controlled by 'membrane-lipid therapy'? / Vígh, L.; Horváth, I.; Maresca, Bruno; Harwood, John L.

In: Trends in Biochemical Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 357-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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