Can the internal energy function of solid interfaces be of a non-homogeneous nature?

G. Láng, K. E. Heusler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Equilibrium thermodynamics rests on the assumption that fundamental equations exist containing all thermodynamic information about a given system. Fundamental relations describing the thermodynamic properties of homogeneous phases are homogeneous functions of the first degree in the extensive variables. Homogeneous functions obey Euler's theorem. This is also true for the surface thermodynamics of stressed solids. The derivation of a `generalized Lippmann equation' for stressed solids first proposed by Couchman et al. and adopted by IUPAC violates the mathematical requirements for a thermodynamic equation and thus cannot be valid.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-173
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Electroanalytical Chemistry
Volume472
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 30 1999

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Thermodynamics
Thermodynamic properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Electrochemistry

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Can the internal energy function of solid interfaces be of a non-homogeneous nature? / Láng, G.; Heusler, K. E.

In: Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Vol. 472, No. 2, 30.08.1999, p. 168-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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