Cadmium and lead in Hungarian porcine products and tissues

Z. Gyóri, B. Kovács, Peter Daniels, Peter Szabo, Clive Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Samples of kidney, blood, lungs, hair, heart, liver, spleen, muscle, ear, rib, skin and faeces were obtained from 200 fattened pigs in 10 abattoirs across Hungary. These were analysed in triplicate for cadmium and lead concentrations by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The highest concentrations of cadmium were found in the kidney, followed by hair and faeces and then liver, heart and lungs. Lead concentrations were greater in the hair and faeces than other tissues. Both lead and cadmium concentrations in meat and offal were below the legal limits. There was more variation in lead than cadmium concentrations between abattoirs, and across abattoirs there was no correlation between concentrations of the two elements. Blood lead concentration was correlated with the lead concentration in bone, kidney, liver, spleen and lungs, and was a better indicator of lead contamination than hair lead concentration. The cadmium concentrations of the kidney, liver, spleen, lungs and faeces were highly correlated, and it is suggested that faeces is the best on-farm indicator of cadmium contamination. Across animals, blood cadmium correlated less closely with the cadmium concentration of the body tissues than it did with the lead concentration, demonstrating positive interaction between the two elements. By contrast, hair and to a lesser extent bone cadmium concentrations were negatively correlated with the lead concentration of most tissues. It is concluded that lead and cadmium concentrations in pigs are best monitored in blood and faeces concentrations, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1049-1054
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 30 2005

Fingerprint

Cadmium
cadmium
Swine
Tissue
swine
Feces
Hair
feces
hairs
Liver
Abattoirs
Blood
lungs
kidneys
slaughterhouses
Kidney
Lung
liver
spleen
Spleen

Keywords

  • Cadmium
  • Lead
  • Pig
  • Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Cadmium and lead in Hungarian porcine products and tissues. / Gyóri, Z.; Kovács, B.; Daniels, Peter; Szabo, Peter; Phillips, Clive.

In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Vol. 85, No. 6, 30.04.2005, p. 1049-1054.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gyóri, Z. ; Kovács, B. ; Daniels, Peter ; Szabo, Peter ; Phillips, Clive. / Cadmium and lead in Hungarian porcine products and tissues. In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 2005 ; Vol. 85, No. 6. pp. 1049-1054.
@article{725f70e7c8714af1a9ff79468d33a961,
title = "Cadmium and lead in Hungarian porcine products and tissues",
abstract = "Samples of kidney, blood, lungs, hair, heart, liver, spleen, muscle, ear, rib, skin and faeces were obtained from 200 fattened pigs in 10 abattoirs across Hungary. These were analysed in triplicate for cadmium and lead concentrations by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The highest concentrations of cadmium were found in the kidney, followed by hair and faeces and then liver, heart and lungs. Lead concentrations were greater in the hair and faeces than other tissues. Both lead and cadmium concentrations in meat and offal were below the legal limits. There was more variation in lead than cadmium concentrations between abattoirs, and across abattoirs there was no correlation between concentrations of the two elements. Blood lead concentration was correlated with the lead concentration in bone, kidney, liver, spleen and lungs, and was a better indicator of lead contamination than hair lead concentration. The cadmium concentrations of the kidney, liver, spleen, lungs and faeces were highly correlated, and it is suggested that faeces is the best on-farm indicator of cadmium contamination. Across animals, blood cadmium correlated less closely with the cadmium concentration of the body tissues than it did with the lead concentration, demonstrating positive interaction between the two elements. By contrast, hair and to a lesser extent bone cadmium concentrations were negatively correlated with the lead concentration of most tissues. It is concluded that lead and cadmium concentrations in pigs are best monitored in blood and faeces concentrations, respectively.",
keywords = "Cadmium, Lead, Pig, Toxicity",
author = "Z. Gy{\'o}ri and B. Kov{\'a}cs and Peter Daniels and Peter Szabo and Clive Phillips",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1002/jsfa.2069",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "1049--1054",
journal = "Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture",
issn = "0022-5142",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cadmium and lead in Hungarian porcine products and tissues

AU - Gyóri, Z.

AU - Kovács, B.

AU - Daniels, Peter

AU - Szabo, Peter

AU - Phillips, Clive

PY - 2005/4/30

Y1 - 2005/4/30

N2 - Samples of kidney, blood, lungs, hair, heart, liver, spleen, muscle, ear, rib, skin and faeces were obtained from 200 fattened pigs in 10 abattoirs across Hungary. These were analysed in triplicate for cadmium and lead concentrations by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The highest concentrations of cadmium were found in the kidney, followed by hair and faeces and then liver, heart and lungs. Lead concentrations were greater in the hair and faeces than other tissues. Both lead and cadmium concentrations in meat and offal were below the legal limits. There was more variation in lead than cadmium concentrations between abattoirs, and across abattoirs there was no correlation between concentrations of the two elements. Blood lead concentration was correlated with the lead concentration in bone, kidney, liver, spleen and lungs, and was a better indicator of lead contamination than hair lead concentration. The cadmium concentrations of the kidney, liver, spleen, lungs and faeces were highly correlated, and it is suggested that faeces is the best on-farm indicator of cadmium contamination. Across animals, blood cadmium correlated less closely with the cadmium concentration of the body tissues than it did with the lead concentration, demonstrating positive interaction between the two elements. By contrast, hair and to a lesser extent bone cadmium concentrations were negatively correlated with the lead concentration of most tissues. It is concluded that lead and cadmium concentrations in pigs are best monitored in blood and faeces concentrations, respectively.

AB - Samples of kidney, blood, lungs, hair, heart, liver, spleen, muscle, ear, rib, skin and faeces were obtained from 200 fattened pigs in 10 abattoirs across Hungary. These were analysed in triplicate for cadmium and lead concentrations by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The highest concentrations of cadmium were found in the kidney, followed by hair and faeces and then liver, heart and lungs. Lead concentrations were greater in the hair and faeces than other tissues. Both lead and cadmium concentrations in meat and offal were below the legal limits. There was more variation in lead than cadmium concentrations between abattoirs, and across abattoirs there was no correlation between concentrations of the two elements. Blood lead concentration was correlated with the lead concentration in bone, kidney, liver, spleen and lungs, and was a better indicator of lead contamination than hair lead concentration. The cadmium concentrations of the kidney, liver, spleen, lungs and faeces were highly correlated, and it is suggested that faeces is the best on-farm indicator of cadmium contamination. Across animals, blood cadmium correlated less closely with the cadmium concentration of the body tissues than it did with the lead concentration, demonstrating positive interaction between the two elements. By contrast, hair and to a lesser extent bone cadmium concentrations were negatively correlated with the lead concentration of most tissues. It is concluded that lead and cadmium concentrations in pigs are best monitored in blood and faeces concentrations, respectively.

KW - Cadmium

KW - Lead

KW - Pig

KW - Toxicity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17444428913&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17444428913&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jsfa.2069

DO - 10.1002/jsfa.2069

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:17444428913

VL - 85

SP - 1049

EP - 1054

JO - Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

JF - Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture

SN - 0022-5142

IS - 6

ER -