C1q receptor on murine cells

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Abstract

Different cells and cell lines of murine origin were tested for their capacity to bind the C subcomponent C1q by using biotinylated human C1q and streptavidin-FITC. Cytofluorometric analysis of splenocytes and thymocytes shows that the majority of C1q-reactive cells reside in the population of B cells and macrophages. There is a significant difference in the C1q-binding capacity of in vitro activated cells; although more than half of the B cell blasts bind the C subcomponent, T cell blasts are virtually negative. It is shown that pre-B lymphomas and cell lines of myeloid origin bind C1q strongly (90 to 98%), whereas in the case of mature B cell lymphomas, plasmocytomas, and the tested T cell lines, the percentage of C1q binding cells varies from 0 to 56. C1q affinity chromatography of the detergent extracts from P388D1 and WEHI-3 cells followed by SDS-PAGE of the eluted proteins under reducing conditions reveals a band at approximately 80 kDa. Analysis of splenocytes shows two additional minor C1q-binding molecules with apparent molecular masses of 50 and 45 kDa, whereas in the case of B cell blasts three bands of similar density are seen at approximately 95, 50 and 45 kDa. C1q-receptors of murine cells are shown to be antigenically related to their human counterpart, because a polyclonal antibody (266A) raised against the human C1q receptor reacts with them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1754-1760
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume145
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 1990

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B-Lymphocytes
Cell Line
T-Lymphocytes
B-Lymphoid Precursor Cells
Plasmacytoma
Streptavidin
Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate
B-Cell Lymphoma
Thymocytes
Affinity Chromatography
Detergents
complement 1q receptor
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Lymphoma
Macrophages
Antibodies
Population
Proteins
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

C1q receptor on murine cells. / Erdei, A.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 145, No. 6, 15.09.1990, p. 1754-1760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Erdei, A 1990, 'C1q receptor on murine cells', Journal of Immunology, vol. 145, no. 6, pp. 1754-1760.
Erdei, A. / C1q receptor on murine cells. In: Journal of Immunology. 1990 ; Vol. 145, No. 6. pp. 1754-1760.
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