Burnout, role conflict, job satisfaction and psychosocial health among Hungarian health care staff: A questionnaire survey

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264 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a growing interest in the psychosocial work environment of health care staff since they are at high risk for burnout, role conflict and job dissatisfaction. Burnout, as a type of prolonged response to chronic job-related stressors, has a special significance in health care where staff experience both psychological-emotional and physical stress. Burnout and the other negative aspects of the job of health care staff have major behavioural and health implications. Objectives: The present study investigated the interrelationships among burnout, role conflict and job satisfaction in a sample of Hungarian health care staff. The study also investigated how these indicators of psychosocial work climate influence respondents' frequency of psychosomatic symptoms. Design: A questionnaire survey (anonymous questionnaires) has been carried out to detect these interrelationships. Settings: Two major hospitals in Szeged, Hungary. Participants: Questionnaires were distributed to 450 health care staff among whom 55.7% were registered nurses. All together, 201 questionnaires were returned and analyzed, giving a response rate of 44.6%. Methods: Questionnaire contained items on work and health-related information (i.e., burnout, job satisfaction, role conflict, and psychosomatic symptoms) and on some basic sociodemographics. Beyond descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression analyses were computed. Results: Findings show that emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores were higher, while scores on personal accomplishment was lower as compared to Canadian, Norwegian or US samples. Burnout, particularly emotional exhaustion (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311-318
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

role conflict
Job Satisfaction
burnout
job satisfaction
health care
staff
Delivery of Health Care
questionnaire
Health
health
Depersonalization
physical stress
Hungary
depersonalization
Conflict (Psychology)
Surveys and Questionnaires
Climate
Psychological Stress
descriptive statistics
work environment

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Health care staff
  • Job satisfaction
  • Psychosocial health
  • Role conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: There is a growing interest in the psychosocial work environment of health care staff since they are at high risk for burnout, role conflict and job dissatisfaction. Burnout, as a type of prolonged response to chronic job-related stressors, has a special significance in health care where staff experience both psychological-emotional and physical stress. Burnout and the other negative aspects of the job of health care staff have major behavioural and health implications. Objectives: The present study investigated the interrelationships among burnout, role conflict and job satisfaction in a sample of Hungarian health care staff. The study also investigated how these indicators of psychosocial work climate influence respondents' frequency of psychosomatic symptoms. Design: A questionnaire survey (anonymous questionnaires) has been carried out to detect these interrelationships. Settings: Two major hospitals in Szeged, Hungary. Participants: Questionnaires were distributed to 450 health care staff among whom 55.7{\%} were registered nurses. All together, 201 questionnaires were returned and analyzed, giving a response rate of 44.6{\%}. Methods: Questionnaire contained items on work and health-related information (i.e., burnout, job satisfaction, role conflict, and psychosomatic symptoms) and on some basic sociodemographics. Beyond descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression analyses were computed. Results: Findings show that emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores were higher, while scores on personal accomplishment was lower as compared to Canadian, Norwegian or US samples. Burnout, particularly emotional exhaustion (p",
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