Bringing habitat information into statistical tests of local adaptation in quantitative traits

A case study of nine-spined sticklebacks

M. Karhunen, O. Ovaskainen, G. Herczeg, J. Merilä

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Detection of footprints of historical natural selection on quantitative traits in cross-sectional data sets is challenging, especially when the number of populations to be compared is small and the populations are subject to strong random genetic drift. We extend a recent Bayesian multivariate approach to differentiate between selective and neutral causes of population differentiation by the inclusion of habitat information. The extended framework allows one to test for signals of selection in two ways: by comparing the patterns of population differentiation in quantitative traits and in neutral loci, and by comparing the similarity of habitats and phenotypes. We illustrate the framework using data on variation of eight morphological and behavioral traits among four populations of nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius). In spite of the strong signal of genetic drift in the study system (average FST = 0.35 in neutral markers), strong footprints of adaptive population differentiation were uncovered both in morphological and behavioral traits. The results give quantitative support for earlier qualitative assessments, which have attributed the observed differentiation to adaptive divergence in response to differing ecological conditions in pond and marine habitats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)559-568
Number of pages10
JournalEvolution
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2014

Fingerprint

Smegmamorpha
local adaptation
Gasterosteidae
quantitative traits
Ecosystem
statistical analysis
case studies
genetic drift
habitat
habitats
footprint
Population
Genetic Drift
natural selection
Pungitius pungitius
phenotype
Bayes Theorem
adaptive radiation
pond
Genetic Selection

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • F
  • G matrix
  • Genetic drift
  • Population differentiation
  • Pungitius pungitius

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bringing habitat information into statistical tests of local adaptation in quantitative traits : A case study of nine-spined sticklebacks. / Karhunen, M.; Ovaskainen, O.; Herczeg, G.; Merilä, J.

In: Evolution, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 559-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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