Az európai sertésinfluenzavírusok evolú ciójának rövid áttekintése; Magyar-és Svédországi Esetek

Translated title of the contribution: Brief summary on the evolution of European influenza viruses; Cases in Hungary and Sweden

Kiss István, A. Bálint, Gyarmati Péter, S. Kecskeméti, Belák Sándor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors provide a concise history of swine influenza viruses in Europe, with special regard to the genetic constellation of the identified and described strains. The current swine influenza subtypes prevalent in Europe comprise avian-like swine H1N1, avian-human reassortant H3N2, reassortant H1N2 viruses of different origin and avianhuman reassortant H3N1 viruses. Based on their own results, the authors refer to some Hungarian and Swedish isolates as examples for particular subtypes, i.e., avian-like swine H1N1, classical swine, avian-human reassortant H3N2, and reassortant H1N2 viruses. The sequenced contemporaneous Hungarian human H1N1 influenza isolate did not show relatedness to its swine counterparts. The accessibility of the sequencing facilities and the development of the relevant technology allow in-depth and large-scale determination of the nucleotide sequence of influenza virus isolates. This activity should be pursued by the national reference laboratories to provide invaluable data for the better understanding of influenza virus ecology, epidemiology, and preventive measures. The ongoing influenza pandemic and the zoonotic threat presented by the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses underline this consideration.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)7-13
Number of pages7
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume132
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Hungary
Orthomyxoviridae
Influenza A virus
Sweden
Swine
Reassortant Viruses
swine
H1N2 Subtype Influenza A Virus
influenza
Human Influenza
swine influenza
pandemic
epidemiology
Influenza in Birds
Zoonoses
Pandemics
Ecology
ecology
nucleotide sequences
viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Az európai sertésinfluenzavírusok evolú ciójának rövid áttekintése; Magyar-és Svédországi Esetek. / István, Kiss; Bálint, A.; Péter, Gyarmati; Kecskeméti, S.; Sándor, Belák.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 132, No. 1, 2010, p. 7-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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