Bone regeneration in osseous defects-application of particulated human and bovine materials

Christian Tudor, Safwan Srour, Michael Thorwarth, Philipp Stockmann, Friedrich Wilhelm Neukam, Emeka Nkenke, Karl Andreas Schlegel, E. Felszeghy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Different bone substitute materials are used to manage the challenge of local bone loss subsequent to craniofacial reconstructive surgery. In this animal study we examined the de novo bone formation in bone defects after insertion of Puros Allograft of human origin or Navigraft of bovine origin, and compared the regenerative potential of each material to that of autogenous bone. Study design: Using the adult domestic pig as the animal model, we created identical bone defects in the frontal skull and filled them with the different test materials using random assignment. A defined number of defects remained unfilled to serve as control. We performed microradiographic, histologic, and polychromatic fluorescence labeling evaluations of the bone specimens at 1, 8, and 12 weeks after the procedure. Results: Both of the materials that we tested allowed for complete bony consolidation of the defects by the end of the test period. After 12 weeks, the microradiographically measured mineralization rate was 5% to 10% lower than the mineralization rate of autogenous bone grafts. Conclusion: Both Puros Allograft and Navigraft met the clinical requirements for bone substitutes, promoting predictable regeneration of the bony defects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)430-436
Number of pages7
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology
Volume105
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

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Bone Regeneration
Bone and Bones
Bone Substitutes
Allografts
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures
Sus scrofa
Osteogenesis
Skull
Regeneration
Animal Models
Fluorescence
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Bone regeneration in osseous defects-application of particulated human and bovine materials. / Tudor, Christian; Srour, Safwan; Thorwarth, Michael; Stockmann, Philipp; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Nkenke, Emeka; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Felszeghy, E.

In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology, Vol. 105, No. 4, 04.2008, p. 430-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tudor, Christian ; Srour, Safwan ; Thorwarth, Michael ; Stockmann, Philipp ; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm ; Nkenke, Emeka ; Schlegel, Karl Andreas ; Felszeghy, E. / Bone regeneration in osseous defects-application of particulated human and bovine materials. In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology. 2008 ; Vol. 105, No. 4. pp. 430-436.
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